NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

Item: 60001.01 | Product Description »

$4.00 - $14.95

  (250) | Write a Review | Ask a Question | 5 Questions

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Absolutely the best cam straps you can buy! The NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Strap has been the favorite of rafters, kayakers, canoeists and other outdoor folks for over 35 years.
  • Our 1" wide polypropylene webbing has a tensile strength of 1,500 pounds, so you can lash down your gear with confidence.
  • We also soak the webbing in our proprietary UV protectant for long life in the sunny outdoors.
  • Two center-mounted stainless-steel springs give our cam buckle a stronger, more secure grip on the webbing.
  • The length of each NRS tie-down strap is woven right into the webbing, so there's never any guesswork when choosing the right size for the job.
  • A waterproof 1" x 3" tag near the buckle gives you a place to write your name and contact info to prove to your buddy that it's your strap, NOT his.
  • Rafters, kayakers, canoeists and other water folks love these burly cargo straps.
  • Yes, they're the gold standard for boaters, but savvy people have found literally hundreds of other uses for them.
  • You'll want these straps for your boating gear bag, car trunk, truck bed, ATV, camper... everywhere.
  • Ask any boater and they'll tell you, "You can never have too many."

Product Reviews

  (250)

Related Videos

  • video: Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage
    Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage
    Length:0:49
  • video: How to Organize Straps
    How to Organize Straps
    Length:0:42
Lashing Capacity: 1,500 lbs.
Features:
  • Strap length woven into polypropylene webbing
  • Buckle has 2 center-mounted stainless-steel springs
  • 1" x 3" waterproof label for contact information
  • Webbing treated with UV protectant
Notes:
  • All strap lengths are measured in feet.

video: Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage

Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage (0:49)

Tired of that tangled mess of NRS straps in your garage? Don't worry, there's a better way. In this Quick Tips video, we show you how to roll your straps for tidy storage. It's simple and easy to do, and will make finding the right strap when you need it much easier.

video: How to Organize Straps

How to Organize Straps (0:42)

As you accumulate a bunch of NRS straps (which you will), keeping them organized will save you a lot of frustration. This video shows one method, putting each of the different lengths on a separate strap.

Do you have questions about this product?

get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

5 Questions | 58 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

    Q:

    So if there is continued use say over the "lifetime" of the product, what is the actual recommended "lifetime" of your 1" HD Tie-Down straps?

    Also, what about continual low weight forces being applied say 150-200lbs? Any literature out there on how well these preform with loads over time?

    Love these straps.

    Thanks!

    Justin
    Asked on 3/11/2014 by rblackfox from Denver- CO

    13 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      These tie down straps have been through many years of whitewater with me and are still in great shape. Also for sift whitewater they are the safest so there is no entanglement- ropes will kill.
      They are reasonably priced and very good.
       
      Luke 18:27
      www.AngelDoveArt.com

      Answered on 3/13/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      they last at least a decade.only use them for canoe or kayak. cam buckle and strap strength is the key. other store bought straps are either cheap and wispy or the hardware is too much. to rate load weight is difficult.

      Answered on 3/12/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Depends on the load, humidity and sunlight exposure. Hard to say, but I
      think they are still the best straps available. I've had others and these
      hold up the best long term

      Answered on 3/12/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      With continued use the 1 inch straps have a "lifetime" of about two years. I use the 1.5 inch straps commercially, and they do not last more than a year or two (180 river days a year). Straps wear at contact points, and loose ends can fray on the road. I actually replace more straps because the metal cam buckle begins to wear, and slips. Also, All it takes is one sharp piece of angle iron on a trailer and a strap can be sliced ( now you just have a shorter strap). The straps are definitely worth the money, and better than ropes with knots, allowing you to really crank thinks down tight and quickly. I have tried tougher webbing, but the cam buckle still wears out. Love straps though.
      Mark
      Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Marko from Westfield, MA
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      My experience with nylon straps is that they will eventually break down.
      This has taken 20 + years in my experience, but it does happen. Then they
      become frayed and eventually break. I save the buckles and my wife makes
      new straps. The process happens faster if they get a lot of sun, which is
      good because it kind of gives you a visual warning in terms of severely
      faded color. Now, the straps made today may have some sort of UV
      stabilizer. I just bought some new ones last year. I'll let you know how
      they are doing in 25 years.

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I can't comment on lifetime use, but can say I have used the same 1" straps several times a month for a few years to secure kayaks on a roof-rack and have not had any significant wear yet. The straps still work well.

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have used these straps for over 2 years. The only that failed was a
      midsubstance rupture when I used my hi lift jack and strap to help pull up
      some roots from a stump!
      With regards to continual use, I have around 8 or 10 in continuous use at
      my storage unit, hanging surplus light fixtures and ceiling fans, xmas yard
      decorations, etc. over the last year. None have slipped or failed, but have
      only been maxed around 30 to 60 lb load.
      I did use them to secure me to over the gable of my roof when I had to
      replace some shingles from storm...
      I know I didn't answer your question but I probably have 30 or 40 straps of
      various sizes and am impressed at their versatility and reliability and
      use..

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Justin, how long the straps will give good service depends in large part on how they're used and in what conditions. Longterm exposure to the sun and abrasion are their main enemies. The webbing comes treated with a good UV protectant, but that can wear off over time. Periodic re-treatment with 303 Protectant will extend that resistance. I've got NRS straps I'm still using that are at least 20 years old. I wouldn't use them as frame tiedowns on my raft, but they're still useful. Sorry, don't have any data on the continual low weight loads. The webbing will stretch a bit over time, but if the job they were being used on was out of the sun they'd probably last indefinitely.

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Clyde from NRS
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Justin,
      I have used NRS straps for many
      Years. As far as I know there is no
      Published life expectancy. In the aviation
      World I work in we have a term called
      "On Condition". This is an aircraft part
      That must have on going inspection
      To determine it's current state of
      Integrity. When it is worn, it is replaced.
      Same would apply here. The NRS strap
      When exposed to ultraviolet light,
      Water, and continuous load long enough
      Will eventually fail. These are quality
      Straps and will last several years of
      Moderate use. Heavy or commercial
      Use like commercial river running will
      Markedly shorten useful life. Hope this
      Helps.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If left out in the sun, I would not use one to strap down anything valuable or dangerous after a year. If stored inside, it will likely last as long as you will unless something cuts, abrades, or melts it.

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have some of these straps that I purchased more than five years ago that are still just fine as far as I can tell. These ones, though, have been used intermittently. In my experience, they get a bit brittle if you subject them to constant sun exposure over a period of a year or so. Having said that, I have NEVER had one actually fail.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      We have used the 1" NRS straps for about 6 years now. We check every year for any that are beginning to fray or might have a tear and discard those. We also examine the cams to ensure that they are still in working order. We have only had one catastrophic failure during this time due to a tear in the strap itself.
      We probably use them about 20-30 times a year and store them rolled up. Look for the video on the NRS site on proper storage.

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I've used them at least once a month for over 5 years in Texas heat/sun and they're still fine.
      Not sure I can answer the loading question. I use them to strap kayaks and furniture where they likely hold at least 200 lbs of force (turning and braking holding 150 lbs of load). I've never lifted anything with them, I use construction straps for that.

      Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
  • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

    Q:

    I'm looking to purchase straps to secure my kayak to my car. Do any of your straps have a rubber coding on the buckle to help prevent the buckle from damaging my cars paint?
    Asked on 7/26/2013 by J

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Check out our 1" Padded Straps, Item # 60003.01.

      Answered on 7/26/2013 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

    Q:

    How do I best tie off the running ends of your straps? In particular, the front and rear safety line tails tend to ride up the line in the wind until the tie-off knot loosens and ultimately releases.
    Asked on 7/24/2013 by Rhonda

    16 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Rhonda,
      After I tighten the strap I put an overhand knot in the running end of the strap and tighten up against the buckle. It wont loosen. You can put a couple of knots like this in if you want. The remaining tail I weave around the strap over and then under. I hope this helps.

      Answered on 7/28/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Rhonda,
      I am not clear exactly what you want to know but I will take a stab at it anyway. If you are using an NRS strap to guy off the front and rear of a roof top carried canoe/kayak, once you have snugged up the slack in the stap through the buckle a simple half hitch of the free end of the strap around itself tightened against the buckle should be sufficient. NRS strap buckles are quite reliable when fastened. To secure the excess strap from flapping in the wind I continue to use half hitches round the snugged strap until all the slack is taken up. As for me I use NRS straps to secure my canoe and kayaks to the roof rack only. For guying off the front and rear I use something called a Rope Rachet which you may locate at your local hardware store or search it in line. It is simple to use and is not impacted as forcefully as as strap when used for guying the front and rear of a roof topped boat. Hope this helps.
      Carl

      Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Do not tie off the loose ends of your straps. Use the correct length strap. I have witnessed a flipped boat with the loose ends of every strap tied in a knot somewhere, it took them hours to de-rig their boat underwater. I have also seen dogs nearly drown due to hanging up on a tied strap.

      Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You can do a couple of things. If I'm using my nrs straps, I keep the buckle close to the boat and wrap the whole thing with a barrel knot. Since it's close to the boat already there is nowhere for the knot to slip to. I suppose you could use a trucker's hitch as well. But you shouldn't need anything like that since the straps have a strong cam already and tying up the excess is done just to get the extra webbing out of the way. On that note try to use a strap that isn't much longer than you need, that way you won't have much excess to worry about.

      Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I do a braid and loop to reduce the length and then wrap that tail in a loop around the tight strap.
      Never had and issue and it unties easily.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use a fishing knot as they are easy to tie and release.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by weezy from gypsum, co
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Rhonda, you've gotten some excellent feedback from other boaters. I'll throw one other in - take the extra tail end and wrap it around your rack cross bar enough times to take up the slack before feeding it through the buckle.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Clyde from NRS
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Use a daisy chain knot. I never have any issues.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Wrap the unused tails around the cinched down strap until they puke, then
      tie them off. They never come undone.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Either tie to something else, wrap around the strap at the buckle to take up slack and then tie, or do as truckers do and coil up the extra and put it under the strap before cinching down.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I tie either a overhand knot or slip knot that you cinch down to the cam.
      DJ Jennings
      Venture Richmond
      Canal Operations Manager

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'm not sure I completely understand your question.  After using the straps to tie down my kayak, if there is a lot of strap left at the end, I simply treat it like a rope and tie two or more half-hitch knots until almost all the strap is used up.  This will prevent loose straps from flagging in the wind when I'm driving to or from the river.  I use straps to tie down a boat to my rack and I use rope for safety lines that are tied to the Bow and stern of the boat and tied back to the bumper or rack.   

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Just keep tying - like in a daisy chain. Below the cam, take the tail and go between the strap and the boat, then through the loop and keep repeating until there's no tail left.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I usually do a quick single overhand knot up by the buckle as a backup and then I do a double overhand with the running end pulled down and away from the buckle to secure the tail.
      If you have a long tail coming out of the buckle on the front tie down it may be difficult for that double overhand to hold since the webbing will catch a lot of wind.
      It is simple, though, to cut the end down to size, leaving you about a two foot tail on a strap dedicated to the front tie down. In general, I try to buy the length closest to what I need and then cut it to fit perfectly, with a two foot tail. I then simply mark the strap with an initial up by the buckle with a sharpie so I can quickly grab the right strap.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Try to tuck the strap under a portion of the strap that is tight or under
      tension.

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use ratchet straps to secure my 7 canoes on a truck and trailer.  I sometimes have several feet of extra strap on the running end, and just use multiple overhand knots.  That usually does the trick--even driving on the freeway for several hours.  I do the same with these cam straps when rigging. You just have to cinch the knots down tightly.  There are some velco wrap-arounds to secure the ends, but they're a pain in the patuti.
      Evan M

      Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
  • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

    Q:

    how long are these straps? I need the 1inch wide.
    Asked on 4/29/2013 by chad from buffalo ny

    11 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Those are the 1" straps in the picture. The length is printed right on the strap next to the NRS logo in feet. So a strap that shows NRS-1 is a 1 foot long strap.

      Answered on 5/3/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are each the length that is marked on them (in feet).

      Answered on 5/1/2013 by RLSTARR from Montague, MI
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Chad, click on the drop down box in the Add to Cart for all the sizes.

      Answered on 4/30/2013 by Clyde from NRS
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are up to 20 ft. They are the best.

      Answered on 4/30/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'm not sure this is a serious question, but just in case it is I'll give a serious answer: Each strap is the length shown on the strap. The NRS-1 is a one foot strap. The NRS-2 is a 2 foot strap. The NRS-12 is a 12 foot strap, etc. You order the length(s) you want.

      Answered on 4/30/2013 by Jill of all trades from Oregon
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The number behind "NRS" is the length of the strap... It look like you are looking at 1" wide too.

      Answered on 4/30/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are all marked at intervals along the strap with length in feet. As you
      can see from product image the range from 1 to 20 feet. Figure out how long
      you need and get that size. Then when strapping up your boat you can reach
      for the exact size you need at each attachment point.

      Answered on 4/30/2013 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi Chad !
      Looking at the NRS website, the tie-down straps come in nine different
      sizes, from 1 foot to 20 foot. 1 foot = 30,5 cm. So you got a good
      variety. I have plenty of them and they last very long.
      Annegret

      Answered on 4/30/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 20 feet long, you tell them how long you want, these are all 1 inch, and they are the best straps!

      Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are the length printed on the strap - NRS-1 is 1 ft, NRS -2 is 2 ft, NRS-4 is 4 ft, etc.
      They are all 1 inch in length

      Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are 1 inch wide, click on the the box that says "size" a pull down
      menu will appear and select the length you need. They come in many lengths.

      Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
  • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

    Q:

    We'll be using these in a salt water environment. How corrosion resistant are the buckles? Stainless steel?
    Thanks
    Brian
    Asked on 12/21/2012 by Brian from La Paz, MX

    17 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Not SS and yes they will corrode in salt water.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Brian,
      The buckles are not stainless steel. The buckles are resistant to corrosion. However if you do not rinse them with fresh water after each use in saltwater and keep them lubricated/protected with a anti-corrosion compound like LPS-3 they will eventually corrode.

      Answered on 12/28/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I've never used them in salt water. They are not stainless, they are cast aluminum or pot metal I think , you had better plan on rinsing them after salt water contact or I suspect they will corrode.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by MikeyNJ from New Jersey
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The body of the buckle is not magnetic which lead to me to believe it's
      either aluminum or stainless. I use them in freshwater scenarios and have
      never had a problem with rust

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Rivermapper from Springfield mo
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Quick answer is that they should hold up pretty well. I'd definitely rinse
      them after each use. The problems would likely come around the spring and
      little crevices that may lose the smooth action.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have used them for many years but only in a fresh water environment. I do put a little lubricant on the cam during winter time and have yet to see any rust. The straps have never failed or become loose while holding my boats on Yakima racks or on our trailer. (knock on wood)
      Sent from Windows Mail

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The buckle body is aluminum. However the hinge pin and double springs are stainless steel. Longer term exposure to saltwater will lead to corrosion. Frequent rinsing in fresh water and applying something like WD-40 will slow down corrosion.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Clyde from NRS
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They are not stainless and will rust out eventually. Stainless will too, in salt water, though, so I would just go by cost of replacement and be very very careful to inspect regularly if they are going to hold anything important.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      not sure- probably not long term...think aluminum for the buckles. They'd
      be fine short term.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Brian:
      The buckles are not stainless, but they do hold up well to corrosion. I’m not sure how you intend to use them in salt water, but if you are boating in salt water, then transport the boat/craft home and rinse the buckles with fresh water, you will be fine.
      Mike

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by WePo Mike from Alexandria, VA
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Since the buckels are Cast Alum, I think they will hold up fine. especially
      when compared to any other strap I've used. I would suggest Corrosion X
      spray if you do have a problem.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Brian-I have only used them in fresh water-river rafting and they work great. I also use longer ones to strap down my surfboards and paddle boards on top off my truck. I do not have any problem with them and can recommend them to you. Ron

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      We use them sea kayaking. The buckles resist corrosion but the pin that forms the hinge will corrode. If you rinse them well after using them, they should be fine for a few years.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      When we sea kayak I give our buckles a little WD 40.
      They can get corrosive in fresh water.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Pete Zimowsky Zimo's Northwest Outdoors from Boise, ID
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      My use is mostly fresh water rivers.
      Have had some of these as long as 20+years. Never thrown one away.
      Carry them always and use them all the time for all sorts of tie downs.
      Strap material should be resistant.
      I believe buckles are aluminum alloy so won't rust but will probably spot and might need care. I usually spray a little 401 if cams get sticky.
      Clears that right up.
      Not sure about springs. Never had those rust.
      Not sure I'd recommend for long term fastening and leaving for weeks or longer in salt water or such environment.
      Good product...Might want to buy a couple to test for your application.
      Hope this helps.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 12/22/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use them in a brackish and a salt water environment for kayaks, SUP and Sunfish. These straps have held up the best and I haven't had a problem at all with the buckles. I haven't seen any corrosion and I've had them a couple years.

      Answered on 12/22/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The buckle is not stainless steel. Have not used them in saltwater.
      Sent from somewhere.

      Answered on 12/22/2012 by Crowbob from Sebastopol, CA
Displaying questions 1-5

Do you have a question about this product? 

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps
 
4.9

(based on 250 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (226)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (20)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

99%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Rugged (75)
  • Functional (73)
  • Lightweight (36)
  • Compact (30)
  • Well built / quality (25)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Rivers (63)
    • Day trip (59)
    • Kayak / canoe / rafting (57)
    • Boating / sailing (51)
    • Rapids paddling (48)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Advanced (33), Intermediate (17), Professional (8)
      • Was this a gift?:
      • No (219), Yes (15)

    Most Liked Positive Review

     

    You can never have enough of these

    I never stop finding reasons to use these short (2') straps. On and off the water, they seem to be used constantly. They are mandatory for my cataraft, but are used...Read complete review

    I never stop finding reasons to use these short (2') straps. On and off the water, they seem to be used constantly. They are mandatory for my cataraft, but are used in many other applications. Even if you don't have a cat, I recommend buying a bunch of these 2 foot goodies.

    VS

    Most Liked Negative Review

     

    "Made in China"

    Not a bad-looking strap, but very disappointed because I try to buy Made in the USA every time I shop. I was under the impression these were, but, sure enough, there is...Read complete review

    Not a bad-looking strap, but very disappointed because I try to buy Made in the USA every time I shop. I was under the impression these were, but, sure enough, there is a big "Made in China" stamp on the back. Next time, I will buy from someone who manufactures here in the U.S.

    Reviewed by 250 customers

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    Displaying reviews 1-5

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    4.0

    i would buy again but a longer strap

    By carlos

    from Caguas, Puerto Rico

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Functional

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Kayaking

      Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

      i tie down my kayak. I wish I would have bought a longer strap

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No
       
      5.0

      Never enough 2 footers

      By PhilBob

      from Santa Fe, NM

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Decent

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Ik
        • Rafting

        Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

        I never seem to have enough 2 footers.

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No
         
        5.0

        Good Product

        By Tony

        from Alpine, tx

        About Me Intermediate

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Rugged

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Boating

          Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

          Dependable

          • Was this a gift?:
          • No
           
          5.0

          The perfect tie down

          By Steelheader

          from Seattle

          About Me Intermediate

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Cleans Easily
          • Functional
          • Rugged

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Boating

            Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

            The perfect strap and buckle...functional and super strong.

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No
             
            4.0

            great product-best available

            By T

            from central Pa

            About Me Advanced

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Functional
            • Lightweight
            • Quick Drying
            • Rugged

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Boating
              • Kayaking
              • Sailing

              Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

              needs a uv coating or ditto protect it in full sum for longer periods of time. Otherwise best product available

              Displaying reviews 1-5

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