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NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

Item: 60001.01 | Product Description »

$4.00–$14.95

  (292) | Write a Review | Ask a Question | 11 Questions

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Absolutely the best cam straps you can buy! The NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Strap has been the first choice of rafters, kayakers, canoeists and other outdoor folks for over 35 years.
  • Our 1" wide polypropylene webbing has a tensile strength of 1,500 pounds, so you can lash down your gear with confidence.
  • We also soak the webbing in our proprietary UV protectant for long life in the sunny outdoors.
  • Two center-mounted stainless-steel springs give our cam buckle a stronger, more secure grip on the webbing.
  • The length of each NRS tie-down strap is woven right into the webbing, so there's never any guesswork when choosing the right size for the job.
  • A waterproof 1" x 3" tag near the buckle gives you a place to write your name and contact info to prove to your buddy that it's your strap, NOT his.
  • Rafters, kayakers, canoeists and other water folks love these burly cargo straps.
  • Yes, they're the gold standard for boaters, but savvy people have found literally hundreds of other uses for them.
  • You'll want these straps for your boating gear bag, car trunk, truck bed, ATV, camper... everywhere.
  • Ask any boater and they'll tell you, "You can never have too many."

Product Reviews

  (292)

Related Videos

  • video: Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage
    Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage
    Length:0:49
  • video: How to Organize Straps
    How to Organize Straps
    Length:0:42
Lashing Capacity: 1,500 lbs.
Features:
  • Strap length woven into polypropylene webbing
  • Buckle has 2 center-mounted stainless-steel springs
  • 1" x 3" waterproof label for contact information
  • Webbing treated with UV protectant
Notes:
  • All strap lengths are measured in feet.

video: Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage

Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage (0:49)

Tired of that tangled mess of NRS straps in your garage? Don't worry, there's a better way. In this Quick Tips video, we show you how to roll your straps for tidy storage. It's simple and easy to do, and will make finding the right strap when you need it much easier.

video: How to Organize Straps

How to Organize Straps (0:42)

As you accumulate a bunch of NRS straps (which you will), keeping them organized will save you a lot of frustration. This video shows one method, putting each of the different lengths on a separate strap.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps
 
4.9

(based on 292 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (264)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (23)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

99%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Rugged (101)
  • Functional (98)
  • Lightweight (50)
  • Compact (39)
  • Quick drying (30)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Kayak / canoe / rafting (79)
  • Boating / sailing (64)
  • Rivers (63)
  • Day trip (59)
  • Rapids paddling (48)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Advanced (33), Intermediate (17), Professional (8)
    • Was this a gift?:
    • No (257), Yes (16)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

You can never have enough of these

I never stop finding reasons to use these short (2') straps. On and off the water, they seem to be used constantly. They are mandatory for my cataraft, but are used...Read complete review

I never stop finding reasons to use these short (2') straps. On and off the water, they seem to be used constantly. They are mandatory for my cataraft, but are used in many other applications. Even if you don't have a cat, I recommend buying a bunch of these 2 foot goodies.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

My old ones are better

I have some straps that are 25 years old. the new ones are not the same quality. The pin is straight and looks like it could fall out. The pin on the old...Read complete review

I have some straps that are 25 years old. the new ones are not the same quality. The pin is straight and looks like it could fall out. The pin on the old ones has a lip on it and can't come out. The new ones have not failed but I have more faith in the old ones, they get 5 stars.

Reviewed by 292 customers

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Displaying reviews 1-5

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5.0

The best money can buy

By Iceman

from Beaufort Sc

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Durable
  • Strong

Cons

  • Started To Fray After 15

Best Uses

    Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

    Trustworthy strap

    • Was this a gift?:
    • No
     
    5.0

    great product

    By Stina

    from Othello Wa

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Functional
    • Lightweight

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Boating
      • Rafting

      Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

      Great tie downs

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No
       
      5.0

      short tie down straps

      By Tank

      from McAllen. TX

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Always Handy
      • Compact
      • Functional
      • Lightweight

      Cons

      • No Protection Over Buckle

      Best Uses

      • Kayaking

      Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

      In addition to tying kayaks, I carry a lot of camping and household items in the back of my pickup truck. Nothing good comes about if it flies out of the back of your truck at >70mph. I find that often times, one doesn't need 12 or 15 footers to do the job, the short ones can tie down items to any one of a multitude of eyehooks in the pickup truck bed. It's also easy to add retractable eyehooks to have additional points to secure your straps.

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No
       
      5.0

      Excellent quality

      By Paul

      from Jacksonville Florida

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Rugged

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Boating
        • Kayaking
        • Sailing
        • Surfing
        • Swimming
        • Waterskiing

        Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

        Use to attach kayaks to vehicle. Use at work when transporting items. Holds the trunk lid down. I use the loops and the straps without the loops the most.

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No
         
        5.0

        Don't look any further for a better strap.

        By Bart

        from Searcy, AR

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Rolls Up For Easy Storage

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Canoeing

          Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

          This was my third time to order these straps. I haven't worn any of them out, I've just added more kayaks and canoes for my kids and grand kids and needed more tie downs. They hold and NEVER slip. I knew I'd use them, so I ordered enough to get free shipping. I also use the 6' strap around my ice chest to hold the lid shut, just in case my wife turns us over!

          • Was this a gift?:
          • No

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          Do you have questions about this product?

          Get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

          11 Questions | 151 Answers
          Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            How long should tie down straps be for a 16' 35" wide canoe?
            Asked on 7/7/2015 by Laplander from Michigan

            21 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12' straps work for almost any canoe, so are the most logical ones to
              use. They can be a bit long with a narrow canoe, or if the rack rails
              are far apart, leading to strapping the canoe closer to the skinny part,
              so just wrap the extra to keep it from flapping and/or causing wind drag.
              Best strapping method: Forward strap first - Run strap under the bar
              away from the close side of the vehicle. Bring both ends up over the
              hull without twists or a full wrap on the bar, so the strap can slide
              freely around the bar, making one or the other end longer at the near
              side of the canoe, being careful not to cross the strap as it comes over
              the hull. With the buckle a foot above the near bar, make a double wrap
              with the non-buckle end around the close end of the bar (a clove hitch),
              making sure the far loop and the near hitch are snug to the gunwales
              (except for extreme tumblehome). Now engage the buckle with the free
              end of the strap and, while insuring both sides of the strap are taking
              the shortest path over the hull, snug the strap to your desired
              firmness; tight enough to keep the gunwales from sliding on the bar, but
              not crushing them or the hull.
              Next, run your bow line (Don't EVER transport a canoe without a
              secure forward line!) to its anchor on or around the bumper, or through
              a hood loop (NOT the forward bar!) and make this taught, firmly seating
              the canoe hull into the front strap. Only after this step do you add
              the rear strap, following the same procedure you used for the front
              strap, making sure it runs free around the far bar loop, isn't crossed
              or twisted coming over the hull, leaving the buckle a foot from the bar,
              wrapping the free end, and snugging the strap up, making sure the strap
              connections to the bar are close to the gunwales.
              A rear line isn't essential but some prefer to be redundant wrt
              safety. If you do wish to run a rear line, insure that the line doesn't
              put a forward pull on the hull by tying to a thwart ahead of the secure
              point instead of the end of the canoe if the end of the canoe sticks out
              beyond the rear secure point.
              Don't paddle too far beyond your skill level and have fun!
              Brad
              Brad Snow
              s/v Aldonza

              Answered on 7/19/2015 by Padeen from Alaska
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Well, that would depend on the width of your vehicle and where the tie down anchors are located, wouldn’t it? So twice the linear distance anchor to anchor over your canoe plus about a foot or two for tensioning. Extra is better than not enough and any loose strap can be daisy chained.

              Answered on 7/12/2015 by Trashman from Arnold, CA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              The simple answer requires a question. What do you plan to strap this canoe
              onto?
              The canoes size is relevant only in relation to the whole. I suggest you put
              the canoe on the vehicle (and rack or whatever you plan to use) and then use
              rope to estimate the length required. Add 6 inches to a foot for slack and
              maneuvering and you know how long they need to be.
              You will probably need front and rear straps with S hooks as well, as a pair
              of plan buckle straps to secure the boat to the vehicle. You can do it with
              less, but unless you want to share my experience of watching a kayak fly off
              my truck at 45 MPH - I don't recommend it.

              Answered on 7/9/2015 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12’ works fine when using Yakima cross bars, looping the strap around the
              protruding end of one bar, then over the top of a 16’ Bell Morning Star
              canoe, then looping around the protruding end of the opposite bar. You
              need to tie up about 1-2’ of excess strap once tightened.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12’ should work if you are strapping boat down closer to the bow and stern.
              15’ would be better if you are strapping boat down closer to the middle (as that section of the boat is wider)
              You can always cut the strap to the length that works best for you.
              If you do cut, cut strap at an diagonal (angled at the end). Then, burn the cut part of strap with a lighter and while it’s still hot, pull strap between two unopened coke cans, or anything flat and smooth. This will keep your cut end nice and smooth - will feed through buckle easier this way.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Paddler from AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I always get 15' straps, You can always fold the excess, but once you are too short, you are out of luck. They are the best straps ever. Never shorten them. You might need them for a bow line to secure your boat to the car. Worth the extra money.
              kathy

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I usually use 9 foot for kayaks, I'd suggest 12 foot for canoes.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Always buy long. Can't make them longer! Always depends on your orientation
              and tie down approach.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Chris from Taunton River, MA
            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              This article shows the common way of strapping a canoe or kayak to a roof rack - http://www.nrs.com/kayaks/tiedown.asp - Measure that distance over your boat and order strap length accordingly. Tie off loose strap ends to keep them from flapping.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Clyde from NRS
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              It depends on where your boat lands on your rack. I have three Mad River Explorers (37"W at widest point) and use 12' NRS straps. Bars on my canoe trailer are 10 feet apart. Provides enough "tail" to pull snug and secure. If bars are close together might need 15', as I did with an old truck rack years ago. To simplify, you can figure where your canoe will rest on your Yakima/Thule bars (or homemade ones) Take a rope or string and loop it under bar and over canoe, and under bar again, leaving about a foot extra. Now measure what you have. Probably close to 12 feet.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Boomer from Birmingham AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Assuming you will be strapping the canoe to rack crossbars, place the canoe
              on the ground. At the approximate points where the straps will go, measure
              from the ground on one side to the ground on the other side. Double this
              value and add at least two feet. Pick the strap that is this length or
              longer. This also assumes that you will be using the usual method of running
              the straps from the near side, across the canoe, around the cross bar on the
              far side, and back again around the near side of the cross bar. Don't forget
              to provide front and rear tie downs as well.
              For additional information you might want to look at Kayak Racks and Loading
              at http://www.cpakayaker.com/resources/kayaking-101/ . While written for
              sea kayaks, there is a lot of useful general information.
              Rich Stevens
              Treasurer
              Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
              <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I have a similar canoe and have used both 12 and 15 ft straps. Either will
              work but the 15 is more versatile. Sometimes I haul two kayaks on a flat
              bar roof rack and can tie down both yaks with a 15 ft strap. The 15 on a
              single canoe leaves a long enough loose end that you can tuck the end
              through the car door, pull tight, and slam the door closed so that there
              are no flapping strap ends and you head to the water.

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I get them 2' longer than the circumference of what I am securing

              Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use 12' straps for canoes in that size.
              Beau Larkin - mobile

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by Beau from Western Montana
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use a 15 foot to tie down a sot 11' x 24" kayak or two of the same kayaks, going through scupper holes and around the roof supports. I use a 2nd strap on the rear of the kayak if I'm traveling on the road rather than up and back to the beach. You may need a 20 without the advantage of scupper holes to pass through. I have many of these straps and use them for multiple purposes, they last for years. A squirt of WD40 on the hinge every couple months doesn't hurt.

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              It depends on the rack or carrier bar's attachment system. As far as going around a canoe or raft longer is better for me. The extra length allowed me to stand on the ground firmly and pull harder to remove slack. The extra strap length can be tied to the roof rack for travel.
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12 feet should suffice

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Well, That’s one wide canoe. I would think this is the length, but if not what I would do
              is take a piece of rope and tie down the canoe as you would. Then measure the rope and maybe add
              a foot or two, and that will be the NRS strap length needed.
              Make sure always have a bowline on the front of the canoe tied to the front of your vehicle somewhere.

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use 9' length for my 16' Mad River Canoe, should give you ample length. cut a string 9' and wrap it with Canoe and what your going to tie it too. Good luck.

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by Islander from Eastern Shore of Virginia
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Depends on what you are lashing to. 9 FT would be a safe bet.

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              All depends on the type of roof rack system you have. I personally have multiple lengths, but find that the 20' straps are a quick go to in any situation as you can make them as short as you need and cleanly fold the remaining strap.

              Answered on 7/7/2015 by Stinkyp from Atlanta, GA
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            What is the best size NRS Tie-Down Straps to handle an 11 foot SUP (Stand Up Paddleboard)?
            Asked on 6/25/2015 by SUP Man from Chicago, IL

            14 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Measure the circumference of your board and add 2ft, when in doubt round up.

              Answered on 6/29/2015 by John from Boston,Ma
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              It depends on the width and thickness not the length of the board, however
              I find the 9' strap allows a "double loop" method to secure even a 30"
              wide, 6" thick board, with a little extra left over. Hope this helps...

              Answered on 6/26/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Length not really the issue, but how wide and deep the board is, and where your yakima/thule bars are in relation to the board. Take a length of rope or string and loop around your rig allowing 6" tail or so, and measure with tape, and see what you get. I have NRS straps in many different lengths, but 12', 6', and 2' are my most used.

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Boomer from Birmingham AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Well, it depends on what type of rack the vehicle had, but a 9' standard would easily handle the job or an 8' of the color coded.

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Assuming you will be using the method of looping the strap around the
              crossbar on the far side of the SUP, and then bringing both ends across the
              top of the SUP and cinching it down around the crossbar on the near side,
              use twice the width of the SUP and add about two feet. Take this measurement
              and use the size strap that is this length or longer. You may need to add a
              bit if you are using a padded cover or thick padding on the bars. Bear in
              mind that you can always cut the straps shorter, but you can't easily make
              them longer. Also consider if you may use the straps for any other purpose
              which may require a longer strap.
              Rich Stevens
              Treasurer
              Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
              <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I'd get 12', better 3' too long than 2" too short.

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Matt Kehoe from Boston, Ma
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              This will depend on your vehicle and rack, but in general a 12 foot should be long enough.

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              9 footers work perfect on kayaks. Should do fine on your sup
              Michael Stewart
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              That kind of depends on how wide it is and how you want to rig it. If it is 4 foot across and you plan to rig it flat on rack crossbars, then you'll probably need at least 9 foot straps. Not sure if that helps or not :)
              Kate
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use the 15 foot to tie down two sot kayaks, which are 11'L 24"W & 11"Deep, over and back across my roof and tied into the rack. When I carry one kayak I use a 9' and have about 4' left after tightening.
              These straps are great, just put some WD40 on the hang every couple months, especially if you are using it with salt water.

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              If strapping to roof rack
              Width ×2 +1ft
              -Glen Chandler

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Jaloppeno from LaGrande OR.
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Whatever size will let you go up over the top twice buy long you can always
              cut it down

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12 footers can handle a canoe so that would certainly be enough but if you
              have the board and the rack already just set it up as you would and run
              string/rope around the route you would use to tie down and then measure
              what you need.

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Dan from Worcester Mass.
            • CUSTOMER CARE

              A:

              I've used the 12' or 15' straps to secure an NRS SUP board (32" wide) to my roof rack. I used the tie-down technique demonstrated here: http://www.nrs.com/kayaks/tiedown.asp

              Answered on 6/25/2015 by Kyle from NRS
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            What size for typing down just one canoe on top of a car using a Thule rack? The 9, 12, or 15 foot nrs strap?
            Asked on 5/3/2015 by Chris from Richmond, VA

            22 answers

            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Chris, this article describes how to strap a boat - http://www.nrs.com/kayaks/tiedown.asp - you can measure that length for your particular boat and choose the length.

              Answered on 5/4/2015 by Clyde from NRS
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Sorry I can't be more helpful, but I would take a rope/string/malleable easuring tape and measure it out first.
              Scott
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Chris,
              I hauled a canoe on a roof rack for many years. I would buy two 15' straps
              and loop them over and back. Any extra you can wrap around the bar. Don't
              forget to tie the bow down to your front bumper with a rope. I also have a
              about 50 of the NRS straps. I love those things. They are very well made
              and last forever.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Use the length that leaves the least amount extra without too much. Take a
              string and wrap it around whatever and measure.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use 12 feet and have some left over. Better too long than too short.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use 15's for both one or two sot kayaks, there is considerable excess with one, but the 15 is more universal.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Depends on how big your canoe is….9 probably enough but to be on safe side, I would go w/ a 12…you can always trip the strap or ties knots to shorten it if needed.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12'
              On the road again!

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use the 15s. But you might get by with a 12 for a single canoe. Tuck
              loose ends into a door. ..pull tight and slam the door. ..no flapping ends.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              What I would is take a piece of string or rope and mimic the way you would tie down the canoe and see how much is needed that way, and then maybe add a foot to that measurement.
              Oh , and don’t for get to use a bow line also to tie to the front bumper, this is mandatory.

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              15 foot

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12ft

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I'd measure the distance from rack rail, up and over the canoe, and back. Buy that length plus a foot ( or two). It's always better to have too much strap than not enough.
              Kate
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Start off thinking the 12 foot strap.
              The 9 foot works great for a Wenonah Voyager, but you will need a larger one
              for many canoes. Consider were the straps will be on the boat when on top
              of the car.
              Each strap will need the height of the boat 4 times, the width of the boat
              twice, add 6 inches just for going under the Thule bars, and another foot
              for pulling it tight and making a safety knot.
              You can always cut the strap shorter if you like.
              John

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Put your boat on your car and use a piece of string where you would place the strap. Then measure the string. Easiest way to get a sure fit. I prefer the strap a little longer because you just never know. Then learn how to do it daisy-chain knot with the rest of the strap so it's not flapping in the wind while you drive.
              Jim
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              12' max. You can cut them to size. I'm not entirely sure

              Answered on 5/4/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              If you get a 15' , you can tie of excess or cut to length and burn edge. Also, recommend bow/stern ties.
              Good luck
              Sent from my Windows Phone

              Answered on 5/4/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Id go with a 15' one, then you could double it, adding extra stability and security to your canoe. Also, don't forget to put one twist in the strap (prevents that annoying numming noise--old truck driver trick). It also saves wear and tear on your straps. If you have extra, then you could cut it with a sharp knife then burn the end with a cigg lighter to keep it from fraying.
              Enjoy!
              Dave
              Please note: message attached

              Answered on 5/4/2015 by Big Dave from Burley, ID
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Really depends on the size of the canoe. I strap everything by looping so
              actually each strap foes over the canoe twice (4 when using 2 straps). I
              typically get by with a 12'.

              Answered on 5/4/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              A 9 foot strap should be enough, but there isn't that much difference in
              cost for the longer straps, and you can always cut the strap to shorten it.
              Just use a match or grill lighter to seal the cut end to keep it from
              fraying. Keeping a longer strap intact, while having to deal with the free
              end, will allow more options in the future.
              Rich Stevens
              Treasurer
              Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
              <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

              Answered on 5/4/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Chris,
              I think the 12 footer should do. Loop the strap around one side of your rack cross bar. Join the strap on the other side and tighten. In other words the strap runs twice over the boat. You may have a little excess strap after tightening to tie off to secure it from flapping as you drive. To be extra sure you have enough strap go for the 15 footer. Many good paddle days to you.
              Carl
              Sent from my iPad

              Answered on 5/5/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Easy to check. Just put the boat up there and run string or rope over the
              same way you would straps, measure the string and add two feet just to be
              sure.
              BTW, I learned the hard way that cutting a length-labeled NRS strap is
              considered very bad form!

              Answered on 5/6/2015 by Dan from Worcester Mass.
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            How long a strap do I need to tie down a 17 foot sea kayak on a Hullavator car assist by Thule? I don't want to buy too long and have them flap around?
            Asked on 2/6/2015 by Rheta from San Diego

            12 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Simple answer is to measure between the two tie down points and add a foot
              or two for slack. A physicist fried taught me to put a twist in the long
              part of the tie down. That alters the harmonics and it won't flap anywhere
              near as much.
              You will always have a little extra at the end, tie it up and go paddling.

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I don't know but how about do a test with a piece of rope following the
              same path you would with the strap, then measure it and add a foot or two.

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Dan from Worcester Mass.
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I would buy a longer strap, and then cut off what you don’t need to be on the safe side.
              Or, place kayak on your rack and then take a piece of rope or string and simulate the way
              you would strap to you rack, and get an approximate length that way.

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Can't help you here. Sorry. Maybe measure a rope and see what works best before you buy a cam strap(s)?
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              While I don’t have this car assist so can’t tell you exactly the length of the straps, I can tell you that you should err on the longer side when buying straps….if too long, you can easily cut them to shorten or just tie your extra strap lengths together and put inside your car door so they don’t flap around.

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Rheta, take a look at these two resources on tying down a boat on your vehicle - http://www.nrs.com/boating_tips/boat_on_top.asp - and - http://www.nrs.com/learn/loading-kayaks-vehicle.asp - Choose the method you will use, then measure the distance the strap will have to travel over your particular boat.

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Clyde from NRS
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Iʻm not familiar with the Thule rack, however it really depends on the beam
              and thickness of the kayak, not the length. I would use a length of rope to
              simulate the way you will be strapping down the kayak, then measure the
              rope. The NRS straps can easily be cut and ends fused (match or lighter) to
              keep from fraying, so buy a longer length then needed and cut to size. Iʻve
              had mine for about 6-7 years and still going strong!

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I own several straps from 9 to 15ft. Tying on a kayak to my standard roof
              rack I always use a long enough strap so that I can tuck the loose ends
              inside the rear door. Pull the loose ends tight and slam the door on them.
              You do not want any flapping straps if going any real distance.

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Rheta...I have a variety of strap lengths because I use them for more then just tying down my canoes and kayak. I haul my boats on a trailer rack and a 9 foot strap is a little short if it goes across the broadest part of the beam of the canoe but would be fine on my kayak. I prefer to use a 12 foot strap because I can tie off the tail. Even though I have never had a strap clamp move once I have snugged it up I still worry that that could happen going down the road at 70 mpg so I think of tying off the tail as a little extra insurance...Eric Harvey.....Ludington MI

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              It really depends on how big around your boat is. I use a 9 ft on mine. I like it a little longer, to short and it's hard to toss over the boat and catch. Use a daisy chain not on the end to keep any extra from flapping. Their easy to tie and just pull to undo.
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 2/6/2015 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              The Hullavator already comes with tie down straps. If you feel these are too
              long for your boat, it's easy to cut them shorter. If cut, use a match or
              grill lighter to treat the cut ends to seal them and prevent the cut ends
              from fraying.
              If you are buying a used Hullavator without straps, that's a difficult
              question to answer as people tend to use different methods to strap a kayak
              down. The best I can suggest is to place the kayak on the Hullavator when it
              is down at the side of your vehicle and then use a string or rope to
              duplicate how you would strap it down. Then measure to see what length you
              would be using. Be sure to add about a foot to the minimum length.
              Alternatively, you can call Thule and ask them what length straps are
              supplied.
              Always use the supplied front and rear tie downs. They are required for
              warranty coverage and will prevent a total disaster if, for any reason, your
              rack should fail. Always be sure your front tie down is securely fastened.
              If you run over your front tie down it can break your kayak in half and
              damage your car.
              Photo: Early
              on Wednesday morning my kayak came of the roof of my van. You can
              see that the rear cradle was ripped off the rack and on my first
              look I thought the bolts holding the cradle had come undone and
              thats why the rack had failed. On closer inspection in day light,
              this is not the case. The front strap was missing, so I can only
              presume that the strap came undone and as the kayak got lifted up
              and pulled back , this ripped the rear cradle off, and the kayak
              was thrown down the road
              Thankfully it was early (0100) so no one was hurt. So what have I
              learnt 1) from now on I will renew my kayak straps each year and
              2) tie down the front of the kayak to the towing hitch. An
              expensive lesson. Thank you David for the photo ... and BIG thanks
              to Grant of www.angleseyadventures.com for the loan of a sea
              kayak, with out any notice!!
              I was on the way for a 0200 departure for crossing the N section
              of the Irish sea, which I will Blog about latter ...
              This was a case where the front tie down came loose, was run over, and it
              ripped the entire rack off of the car. He has the rack, with kayak still
              strapped to it, leaning against the side of his car.
              Rich Stevens
              Treasurer
              Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
              <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

              Answered on 2/7/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              You can always cut them if they are too long. Extra length lets you add a
              safety knot, and lets you give a good pull and get it nice and tight. I
              would be thinking the NRS-9, but please use a long strap and measure how
              much of it you used. Remember sometimes a boat is a little bit forward or
              backward of exact middle, so start off a little bigger. Tape or tie any
              extra length.

              Answered on 2/9/2015 by Anonymous
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            What is the difference between a unit of "each" or a pair"?
            Asked on 7/22/2014 by Steve

            4 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Each is one. A pair is two each's.
              Jace Crane

              Answered on 7/22/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              These straps generally come as a single item. So each is one. Some configurations (typically not the the plain straight foot marked straps) may come in pairs, as in two straps or strap sets.

              Answered on 7/23/2014 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Steve,
              A unit of each is a single item.
              A pair is matched items in a single
              Package.
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 7/23/2014 by Anonymous
            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Steve, if you choose "Each" you are getting one strap. With the 9' and longer lengths you have the option of buying a pair (two) straps, at a small savings.

              Answered on 7/23/2014 by Clyde from NRS
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            I'm new to kayaking and want to get some nrs tie-downs and wonder what the most common lengths
            are. I'll be tying to roof top and back of truck. Any suggestions?
            Asked on 6/10/2014 by raplemmons

            20 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use 9 footers for kayaks, 12 footers for canoes. Hope that helps!

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use 12 foot straps to go over and back for my fishing kayak and 9 foot to go over and back my SUP.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Get a variety of every sizeTie downs are like duct tape

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by chuck from elko nv
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              It depends on the width of your kayak and how your tying it down. Typically, 9 or 12 foot lengths are adequate.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use a pair of 12 footers on my canoe, the kayak I just throw in the truck.

              Answered on 6/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use them for lashing cataraft tubes to a frame, so the short ones (1 - 3)
              are good for me.
              I'd guess 6, 9 12 would be better for you.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              9 & 12 ft, measure what length you will need. { ie creek boats need longer
              straps compared to play boats because of the girth difference.}

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              NRS -12 is the perfect length for a canoe strapped to a bar rack.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              We have used both 9’ and lengths, really depends on the width of your boat and what you are fastening them down to. I probably would recommend the 15’ and simply secure the extra length. You can also cut off the 15’ to whatever length you desire and burn the cut end so it will not unravel. NRS straps are by far the best ones to use, clean them periodically and they will last for years.
              Enjoy!
              Rob
              Please help our planet, do not print.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              It really depends upon what you are tying down and where. I use 4' to tie
              boats in the back of a pickup and the 9' for general use. I always tie
              boats on top with two cam-buckle NRS straps and put another (10' ) at the
              front and back of vehicle. When you have had a boat come off at 45 mph it
              makes appreciate having a few too many straps. The nice part of NRS straps
              is the length is woven in so you can tell them apart.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              The most useful lengths that I have found for roof-topping my kayak are the
              12 footers. I have a Ocean Kayak Malibu 2, with a 34 inch width. If you
              figure 4 times the width of your boat, you should have plenty of strap to
              work with.
              For bow and stern tie-downs, you may be able to use the 20 footers
              depending on your vehicle, but I would recommend using a tie-down kit with
              bumper hooks. Having both the bow and stern tied down on the highway is a
              must. Non-highway you can probably get by with just one on the front, or
              maybe even just the roof rack straps up to ~30 MPH. But if you hit a wind
              gust, having a pointy end tied down is reassuring and will avoid the kayak
              twisting on top of your vehicle.
              Don't forget to twist all the straps a couple times on each side to avoid
              wind vibrations.
              I have several buddies who do big whitewater rafting trips in the Grand
              Canyon and other places. They all swear by NRS straps (and dry bags) and
              so do I. I haven't used anything else for 15+ years and have accumulated a
              bunch, all are well used but still fine. Having a couple straps in most of
              the sizes always comes in handy. It is a cheap investment to keep your
              gear where you want it.
              Hope that helps.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I like the 6 footer for securing my
              high performance sea kayaks. If you
              are securing a larger beam
              recreational kayak the 9 footer would
              Probably be a better choice.
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              If you have a rack on your truck you’ll probably need 9s or 12s. Longer will also work, but then you’ll have to daisy chain the loose end to keep it from flopping in the wind. If you’re rigging to the cab and tailgate you’ll need longer. You can always join two together to make a longer strap, but having the right length is cleaner. Get a small gym bag to carry them or you’ll lose them. I dip my new cams in vinegar then shoot them with a coat of white primer followed by a coat of kryptonite yellow so I know which ones are mine.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Trashman from Arnold, CA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I tie down one or two Ocean Kayak sot's to the roof of my suv on a Thule rack. I use 15's for one or two kayaks, a 15 will pass through the scupper holes of both kayaks and pass around the kayaks and the rack. If I am just going from home to the ocean, 1 mile I only use one tie down, but anywhere further I tie them down front and back. I also use some 20's for triple kayak tie down. The NRS straps are great, I use them around 200 days a year. They hold up well to sun and salt water.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              In a broad sense, you can't go wrong with too long of straps. But always tie off the excess slack to keep it from flapping/noise or catching in a wheel (really bad - you'd be surprised at the damage to your vehicle, not to mention kayak/racks).
              There's not much difference in cost (in the long run, since straps last a decade).
              But you can measure (using rope and then a tape measurer) based on how you plan to tie your boat up on your vechicle. Leave extra length to pull tight and tie, etc.
              I always keep at least 2 straps of at least these 3 sizes in my truck:
              9', 15' 20'.
              But I tie the boats in the bed, sometimes tailgate up, sometimes down.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I haul Kayaks on top of a Honda CRV and 15 feet is my goto length. That is
              a bit long but I like to tuck the loose ends in thru the door. that allows
              me to visually check for slippage while on long trips. A 15 footer allows
              you to tie down two Kayaks on the same roof rack. I also own shorter
              lengths and use them for short hauls or when I carry lumber or pipe on the
              rack.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Hello depending on the type of rack you have and how many kayaks:
              On rooftop: 1-2 kayaks 12 or 15 footer; 3 kayaks 20 footer.
              In truck bed same as above . Since straps are not that expensive I would get a variety.
              And if you are on a raft supported trip, nice to see a yaker with extra straps .. never can have too many

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Guru of GC from Lake Stevens, WA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              For a single play boat I prefer one 12' strap. For 1-2 creek boats, a single 15' strap works great if you stack the boats and run the strap through the security bars.

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by azmtnman from Phoenix, AZ
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              In my experience, anything shorter than 12 feet is too short to double up boats on each side of a stacker rack. But 12 feet is a bit long, if you only plan on strapping boats individually (without a stacker).

              Answered on 6/10/2014 by Utah Dave from Logan, Utah
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Plan for a longer strap....I suggest a 15 foot....if it's too long you can always cut it to shorten it or tie excess strap together....

              Answered on 6/11/2014 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            So if there is continued use say over the "lifetime" of the product, what is the actual recommended "lifetime" of your 1" HD Tie-Down straps?

            Also, what about continual low weight forces being applied say 150-200lbs? Any literature out there on how well these preform with loads over time?

            Love these straps.

            Thanks!

            Justin
            Asked on 3/11/2014 by rblackfox from Denver- CO

            13 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I've used them at least once a month for over 5 years in Texas heat/sun and they're still fine.
              Not sure I can answer the loading question. I use them to strap kayaks and furniture where they likely hold at least 200 lbs of force (turning and braking holding 150 lbs of load). I've never lifted anything with them, I use construction straps for that.

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              We have used the 1" NRS straps for about 6 years now. We check every year for any that are beginning to fray or might have a tear and discard those. We also examine the cams to ensure that they are still in working order. We have only had one catastrophic failure during this time due to a tear in the strap itself.
              We probably use them about 20-30 times a year and store them rolled up. Look for the video on the NRS site on proper storage.

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I have some of these straps that I purchased more than five years ago that are still just fine as far as I can tell. These ones, though, have been used intermittently. In my experience, they get a bit brittle if you subject them to constant sun exposure over a period of a year or so. Having said that, I have NEVER had one actually fail.
              Sent from my iPad

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              If left out in the sun, I would not use one to strap down anything valuable or dangerous after a year. If stored inside, it will likely last as long as you will unless something cuts, abrades, or melts it.

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Justin,
              I have used NRS straps for many
              Years. As far as I know there is no
              Published life expectancy. In the aviation
              World I work in we have a term called
              "On Condition". This is an aircraft part
              That must have on going inspection
              To determine it's current state of
              Integrity. When it is worn, it is replaced.
              Same would apply here. The NRS strap
              When exposed to ultraviolet light,
              Water, and continuous load long enough
              Will eventually fail. These are quality
              Straps and will last several years of
              Moderate use. Heavy or commercial
              Use like commercial river running will
              Markedly shorten useful life. Hope this
              Helps.
              Sent from my iPhone

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Justin, how long the straps will give good service depends in large part on how they're used and in what conditions. Longterm exposure to the sun and abrasion are their main enemies. The webbing comes treated with a good UV protectant, but that can wear off over time. Periodic re-treatment with 303 Protectant will extend that resistance. I've got NRS straps I'm still using that are at least 20 years old. I wouldn't use them as frame tiedowns on my raft, but they're still useful. Sorry, don't have any data on the continual low weight loads. The webbing will stretch a bit over time, but if the job they were being used on was out of the sun they'd probably last indefinitely.

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Clyde from NRS
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I have used these straps for over 2 years. The only that failed was a
              midsubstance rupture when I used my hi lift jack and strap to help pull up
              some roots from a stump!
              With regards to continual use, I have around 8 or 10 in continuous use at
              my storage unit, hanging surplus light fixtures and ceiling fans, xmas yard
              decorations, etc. over the last year. None have slipped or failed, but have
              only been maxed around 30 to 60 lb load.
              I did use them to secure me to over the gable of my roof when I had to
              replace some shingles from storm...
              I know I didn't answer your question but I probably have 30 or 40 straps of
              various sizes and am impressed at their versatility and reliability and
              use..

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I can't comment on lifetime use, but can say I have used the same 1" straps several times a month for a few years to secure kayaks on a roof-rack and have not had any significant wear yet. The straps still work well.

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              My experience with nylon straps is that they will eventually break down.
              This has taken 20 + years in my experience, but it does happen. Then they
              become frayed and eventually break. I save the buckles and my wife makes
              new straps. The process happens faster if they get a lot of sun, which is
              good because it kind of gives you a visual warning in terms of severely
              faded color. Now, the straps made today may have some sort of UV
              stabilizer. I just bought some new ones last year. I'll let you know how
              they are doing in 25 years.

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              With continued use the 1 inch straps have a "lifetime" of about two years. I use the 1.5 inch straps commercially, and they do not last more than a year or two (180 river days a year). Straps wear at contact points, and loose ends can fray on the road. I actually replace more straps because the metal cam buckle begins to wear, and slips. Also, All it takes is one sharp piece of angle iron on a trailer and a strap can be sliced ( now you just have a shorter strap). The straps are definitely worth the money, and better than ropes with knots, allowing you to really crank thinks down tight and quickly. I have tried tougher webbing, but the cam buckle still wears out. Love straps though.
              Mark
              Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

              Answered on 3/11/2014 by Marko from Westfield, MA
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Depends on the load, humidity and sunlight exposure. Hard to say, but I
              think they are still the best straps available. I've had others and these
              hold up the best long term

              Answered on 3/12/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              they last at least a decade.only use them for canoe or kayak. cam buckle and strap strength is the key. other store bought straps are either cheap and wispy or the hardware is too much. to rate load weight is difficult.

              Answered on 3/12/2014 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              These tie down straps have been through many years of whitewater with me and are still in great shape. Also for sift whitewater they are the safest so there is no entanglement- ropes will kill.
              They are reasonably priced and very good.
               
              Luke 18:27
              www.AngelDoveArt.com

              Answered on 3/13/2014 by Anonymous
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            I'm looking to purchase straps to secure my kayak to my car. Do any of your straps have a rubber coding on the buckle to help prevent the buckle from damaging my cars paint?
            Asked on 7/26/2013 by J

            1 answer

            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Check out our 1" Padded Straps, Item # 60003.01.

              Answered on 7/26/2013 by Clyde from NRS
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            How do I best tie off the running ends of your straps? In particular, the front and rear safety line tails tend to ride up the line in the wind until the tie-off knot loosens and ultimately releases.
            Asked on 7/24/2013 by Rhonda

            16 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Use a daisy chain knot. I never have any issues.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use a fishing knot as they are easy to tie and release.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by weezy from gypsum, co
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Try to tuck the strap under a portion of the strap that is tight or under
              tension.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Rhonda, you've gotten some excellent feedback from other boaters. I'll throw one other in - take the extra tail end and wrap it around your rack cross bar enough times to take up the slack before feeding it through the buckle.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Clyde from NRS
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I use ratchet straps to secure my 7 canoes on a truck and trailer.  I sometimes have several feet of extra strap on the running end, and just use multiple overhand knots.  That usually does the trick--even driving on the freeway for several hours.  I do the same with these cam straps when rigging. You just have to cinch the knots down tightly.  There are some velco wrap-arounds to secure the ends, but they're a pain in the patuti.
              Evan M

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I usually do a quick single overhand knot up by the buckle as a backup and then I do a double overhand with the running end pulled down and away from the buckle to secure the tail.
              If you have a long tail coming out of the buckle on the front tie down it may be difficult for that double overhand to hold since the webbing will catch a lot of wind.
              It is simple, though, to cut the end down to size, leaving you about a two foot tail on a strap dedicated to the front tie down. In general, I try to buy the length closest to what I need and then cut it to fit perfectly, with a two foot tail. I then simply mark the strap with an initial up by the buckle with a sharpie so I can quickly grab the right strap.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I'm not sure I completely understand your question.  After using the straps to tie down my kayak, if there is a lot of strap left at the end, I simply treat it like a rope and tie two or more half-hitch knots until almost all the strap is used up.  This will prevent loose straps from flagging in the wind when I'm driving to or from the river.  I use straps to tie down a boat to my rack and I use rope for safety lines that are tied to the Bow and stern of the boat and tied back to the bumper or rack.   

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Just keep tying - like in a daisy chain. Below the cam, take the tail and go between the strap and the boat, then through the loop and keep repeating until there's no tail left.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I tie either a overhand knot or slip knot that you cinch down to the cam.
              DJ Jennings
              Venture Richmond
              Canal Operations Manager

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Either tie to something else, wrap around the strap at the buckle to take up slack and then tie, or do as truckers do and coil up the extra and put it under the strap before cinching down.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Wrap the unused tails around the cinched down strap until they puke, then
              tie them off. They never come undone.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I do a braid and loop to reduce the length and then wrap that tail in a loop around the tight strap.
              Never had and issue and it unties easily.

              Answered on 7/24/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              You can do a couple of things. If I'm using my nrs straps, I keep the buckle close to the boat and wrap the whole thing with a barrel knot. Since it's close to the boat already there is nowhere for the knot to slip to. I suppose you could use a trucker's hitch as well. But you shouldn't need anything like that since the straps have a strong cam already and tying up the excess is done just to get the extra webbing out of the way. On that note try to use a strap that isn't much longer than you need, that way you won't have much excess to worry about.

              Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Do not tie off the loose ends of your straps. Use the correct length strap. I have witnessed a flipped boat with the loose ends of every strap tied in a knot somewhere, it took them hours to de-rig their boat underwater. I have also seen dogs nearly drown due to hanging up on a tied strap.

              Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Rhonda,
              I am not clear exactly what you want to know but I will take a stab at it anyway. If you are using an NRS strap to guy off the front and rear of a roof top carried canoe/kayak, once you have snugged up the slack in the stap through the buckle a simple half hitch of the free end of the strap around itself tightened against the buckle should be sufficient. NRS strap buckles are quite reliable when fastened. To secure the excess strap from flapping in the wind I continue to use half hitches round the snugged strap until all the slack is taken up. As for me I use NRS straps to secure my canoe and kayaks to the roof rack only. For guying off the front and rear I use something called a Rope Rachet which you may locate at your local hardware store or search it in line. It is simple to use and is not impacted as forcefully as as strap when used for guying the front and rear of a roof topped boat. Hope this helps.
              Carl

              Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Rhonda,
              After I tighten the strap I put an overhand knot in the running end of the strap and tighten up against the buckle. It wont loosen. You can put a couple of knots like this in if you want. The remaining tail I weave around the strap over and then under. I hope this helps.

              Answered on 7/28/2013 by Anonymous
          • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

            Q:

            how long are these straps? I need the 1inch wide.
            Asked on 4/29/2013 by chad from buffalo ny

            11 answers

            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              They are 1 inch wide, click on the the box that says "size" a pull down
              menu will appear and select the length you need. They come in many lengths.

              Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              They are the length printed on the strap - NRS-1 is 1 ft, NRS -2 is 2 ft, NRS-4 is 4 ft, etc.
              They are all 1 inch in length

              Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              They are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 20 feet long, you tell them how long you want, these are all 1 inch, and they are the best straps!

              Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Hi Chad !
              Looking at the NRS website, the tie-down straps come in nine different
              sizes, from 1 foot to 20 foot. 1 foot = 30,5 cm. So you got a good
              variety. I have plenty of them and they last very long.
              Annegret

              Answered on 4/30/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              They are all marked at intervals along the strap with length in feet. As you
              can see from product image the range from 1 to 20 feet. Figure out how long
              you need and get that size. Then when strapping up your boat you can reach
              for the exact size you need at each attachment point.

              Answered on 4/30/2013 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              The number behind "NRS" is the length of the strap... It look like you are looking at 1" wide too.

              Answered on 4/30/2013 by Anonymous
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              I'm not sure this is a serious question, but just in case it is I'll give a serious answer: Each strap is the length shown on the strap. The NRS-1 is a one foot strap. The NRS-2 is a 2 foot strap. The NRS-12 is a 12 foot strap, etc. You order the length(s) you want.

              Answered on 4/30/2013 by Jill of all trades from Oregon
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              They are up to 20 ft. They are the best.

              Answered on 4/30/2013 by Anonymous
            • Staff Reviewer

              A:

              Chad, click on the drop down box in the Add to Cart for all the sizes.

              Answered on 4/30/2013 by Clyde from NRS
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              They are each the length that is marked on them (in feet).

              Answered on 5/1/2013 by RLSTARR from Montague, MI
            • VERIFIED BUYER

              A:

              Those are the 1" straps in the picture. The length is printed right on the strap next to the NRS logo in feet. So a strap that shows NRS-1 is a 1 foot long strap.

              Answered on 5/3/2013 by Anonymous
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