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NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner

Item: 50027.01 | Product Description »

$17.95

  (6) | Write a Review | Ask a Question | 2 Questions

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Prevent paddles from escaping downstream. This large 'biner (4.75"L x 3"W) has a 1.375"W gate opening to accommodate most paddle shafts.

Not intended for climbing or rescue applications.

This product is not CE approved.

Product Reviews

  (6)
Material: Aluminum
Dimensions: 120.65 mm L x 76.2 mm W
Gate Opening: 34.925 mm
Features:
  • Fits Around Most Paddle Shafts
  • Solid Gate Carabiner

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2 Questions | 17 Answers
Displaying questions 1-2
  • NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner

    Q:

    how is this being used/attached to kayak with paddle clipped in it
    Asked on 7/5/2014 by stumped

    8 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I had the idea of using this to attach my paddle to a handle on the side of
      my kayak when I wasn't paddling but it didn't really work well. It was too
      awkward getting the paddle in and out. I opted for a deck mounted clip that
      folds down flat when not in use. It works great.

      Answered on 7/17/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use mine with an inflatable kayak.
      1 sewn onto my thigh strap for quick clip handsfree / flat water relax mode
      With a 2nd one tied onto and then duct taped in place on the seat/flip line behind me for when I am turning around to reach gear behind me and also for a place to clip someone else's paddle that I rescued, (keeps it behind me and out of the way)

      Answered on 7/10/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Obviously the paddle takes up most of the space inside the paddle biner, but it's still possible to attach it to a thin D-ring on the side of your boat or on your PFD (life vest), which will free up your hands to complete a self-rescue if you've dumped. Just make sure any D-ring on your PFD has a quick release, because your paddle can easily get caught in wood or rocks and thus can be a drowning risk.
      Dr. Jeff Van Kirk
      General Dentist
      Stayton, Oregon

      Answered on 7/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      There aren't many 'devices' that are large enough to quickly clip onto a
      paddle shaft and secure it to a kayak. This is one.
      I use the paddle 'biner for two things:
      (1) Attaching your paddle to a kayak while you're otherwise occupied. It's
      mouth is wide/smooth enough to accept a paddle shaft. If it's attached to
      your kayak in some way (deck line/bungie cord/short rope) you can snap your
      paddle shaft into it before you deal with something else (so your paddle
      can't float away, because it can't slip out past the paddle blades).
      (2) For the 'towee' on a tow line. This 'biner doesn't have a hook at the
      mouth to lock the latch-gate (most mountaineering carabiners do), so it
      won't catch on a line if there's a need to release it smoothly in an
      emergency.
      I use it as a combination of (1) paddle tether and (2) short tow rope. I
      have an 8foot piece of mid-weight static (non-stretchy) floating line
      between two carabiners (photo 1). At one end is the paddle 'biner (red)
      and at the other is another carabiner, the silver one. The silver 'biner is
      also hookless, but smaller, so it can't accept a kayak paddle shaft
      (perspective in the photo makes it seem larger). Because both carabiners
      are 'hookless' both the 'tow-er' and 'towee' can easily release if there's
      trouble during a tow.
      I attach both 'biners to the left deck line, then thread them under the
      forward deck bungie line in a way that they will slide out from under the
      bungies easily (photo 2). At the top of the photo you can see the two
      carabiners attached to the reflective (non-stretchy) deck line, then the
      reflective line linking the carabiners is snaked UNDER the bungie cords.
      It's long enough that the bow of a towed kayak is about 1foot behind me.
      This is for short intense rescue, not lengthy tows. I have a 25'/50' tow
      belt (with bungie cord to mitigate shocks) for longer towing tasks.
      So for some tasks, the paddle 'binder can be used to secure your paddle so
      it doesn't float away, and with the right setup, it can also be used for a
      short tow/rescue link.

      Answered on 7/5/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Answer
      http://bloyd-peshkin.blogspot.com/2008/10/making-your-own-short-tow-one-on-your.html

      Answered on 7/5/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I only use this in a rescue situation (not to secure a back-up paddle). I clip it to one of my grab loops on the stern of my kayak when I've used it. The paddle just kinda bangs around back there, but it seems to work.

      Answered on 7/5/2014 by Anonymous from Cincinnati, OH
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Dear sirs, I have two of them one on the end of my life line and one on
      the end of my 100' lining rope. They both hook around my one inch steel
      raft frames. Nice way to attach and unattach without having to tie or
      untie. Sincerely Del

      Answered on 7/5/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      This carabiner is used for gear retrieval. It could be attached to a tow tether, then clipped on the shaft of a runaway paddle.

      Answered on 7/5/2014 by Anonymous
  • NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner

    Q:

    Does this Device have all corrosion resistant parts including the spring? I am a sea kayaker and would use this device in salt water. I have had other carabineers, particularly the spring, corrode. Thank you for your time.
    Asked on 6/17/2013 by TBSKPrez from Tampa, Fl.

    9 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'm sort to let you know that this prodact has problem in salt water.I would not buy it if I knew this before.
      Doron.
      מקושר על-ידי Motorola

      Answered on 6/21/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am a sea kayaker also. I have had this carabiner for two years without
      any problem with corrosion. I use mine for my tow line. It is exposed to
      salt water every trip. So far I haven't had an issue. However, I do rinse
      all my gear after every trip to help reduce the likelyhood of corrosion.
      Overall I have been very satisfied with this caribiner.
      Cheers

      Answered on 6/19/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

       
      I am not sure if it is corrosion proof or not. I bought 2 of them and have been using them for a couple of years in fresh and salt water. I usually try to rinse my gear after being in salt water and they are still working fine and I haven't taken time to oil them or do any other maintenance. When I am boating they are on a strap around my waist so they are always getting wet whenever I go out.
      Hope this helps..
      Bill
      Benjamin Franklin 1775

      Answered on 6/19/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have one and have used it, but only in fresh water.  No signs of any corrosion on any of it, including what I can see of the spring.  However, I can't tell what the spring is made of or if it will corrode in saltwater.  Any metal will corrode in saltwater if just left untreated.  I think this will last a long time if you just rinse it off in fresh water after it has been exposed to saltwater.

      Answered on 6/18/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I believe it is completely corrosion resistant, but I'm not 100 percent certain about the spring. Mine has no signs of corrosion. I've only used it in fresh water. It's a nice sturdy clip with a strong spring. I've used it to secure paddles, bags, my kayak, and other things I've wanted to hold that require a large opening. While not load bearing, it is more than strong enough to secure any thing in my kayak.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 6/17/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I used it in sea water and it gunked it up. I had to use a fair bit of oil to get it right. I would say it's a no go in sea water.

      Answered on 6/17/2013 by Anonymous from Cincinnati, OH
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes -- totally corrosion resistant. I have one on my short tow line, and it
      is pristine.
      The old version of the NRS paddle biner had a heavy wire gate that doubled
      as the spring, and that rusted pretty badly, though you could usually
      restore the functionality by working it in water. But the new one has a
      totally different gate and some kind of internal spring mechanism that I
      cannot even figure out, and is totally corrision-resistant.

      Answered on 6/17/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi,
      Year two with this product in sea. No corrosion. Working well.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 6/17/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I sea kayak also. The gate did jam after a some time (can't remember
      exactly how long) but I wouldn't recommend. I have one with a wire gate
      now... much better.

      Answered on 6/17/2013 by Anonymous
Displaying questions 1-2

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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner
 
4.7

(based on 6 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to attach (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No (4)

      Reviewed by 6 customers

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      Displaying reviews 1-5

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      4.0

      Does what it's supposed to do.

      By MSO boater

      from Missoula, MT

      About Me Casual/ Recreational

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Easy To Attach
      • Rugged

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Day Trips
        • Recreational Paddlers
        • Touring

        Comments about NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner:

        I keep this big 'biner clipped to my IK on whitewater floats. Good for clipping in a friend's lost paddle after a dump, or for clipping my own at riverbank stops so it can't get away. Only 'biner I've found that clips easily around a paddle shaft.

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No
         
        4.0

        Yup - it's a biner.

        By Mayhem Mouse

        from Blaine, MN

        About Me Casual/ Recreational

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Nice Wide Gate
        • Seems Plenty Solid

        Cons

        • Difficult To Attach

        Best Uses

          Comments about NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner:

          Bought to attach to the end of a tow tether to collect loose boats and to hold an occasional paddle. I have an AT bentshaft ww blade and it does fit over the shaft, but there is no room to spare. Should be easy to clip to a boat though.

          • Was this a gift?:
          • No
           
          5.0

          Works great on th Doug's leash.

          By Wedowee

          from Alabama

          About Me Advanced

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Easy To Attach
          • Reduces Fatigue

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Day Trips
            • Recreational Paddlers
            • Touring

            Comments about NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner:

            Would work well for more traditional paddling applications.

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No
             
            5.0

            Improved Paddle Biner

            By River Bill

            from Hopewell, Missouri

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Easy To Attach

            Cons

              Best Uses

                Comments about NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner:

                Own three of the previous Paddle Biners with the wire gate and was prepared to buy another for quick attachments to cat frame. Really like the solid gate on the new biner. There is no deflection/twisting of the wire and no sticking of the gate. Also, there is no "hook" for the wire at the gate closure point. I found these "hooks" used to get tangled in poly rope or on the wire components of surplus ammo cans. An improved product for sure.

                (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                5.0

                Love it. It is very handy.

                By SK

                from Grand Rapids, MI

                Pros

                • Quick to open
                • Simple

                Cons

                  Best Uses

                    Comments about NRS Solid Gate Paddle Biner:

                    I sometimes use a paddle leash on rivers to ensure it doesn't get dropped into the water while resting, but prefer not to, and always on open water.
                    This unit works great as a paddle park when stopping for a break on the rivers. No more wedging a paddle blade under the bungies. The paddle shaft slips in and out easily.
                    Neatest item I've found in over 16 years of kayaking. Simple idea, but very,very handy and easy to use.
                    Thanks NRS.

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