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NRS Tow Tether

Item: 50005.01 | Product Description »

$29.95

  (22) | Write a Review | Ask a Question | 4 Questions

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This strong tether with a built-in bungee is used with the quick-release harnesses on rescue PFDs. The tether enhances towing performance in rescue situations. The stainless O-ring includes a hook patch of "hook and loop" material that facilitates centering of the O-ring on vests that have the loop material sewn on in the back. It also has a hook patch on the carabiner end. This mates with a loop piece available on some rescue PFDs, forming a quick-release holder for the carabiner.

Short Tether 33: 19" (Stretches to 33")
Long Tether 53: 33" (Stretches to 53")
Add 6" to Length for Carabiner and O-ring

Product Reviews

  (22)
Lengths:
  • Short tether 33: 19" (Stretches to 33")
  • Long tether 53: 33" (Stretches to 53")
Includes:
  • Omega Five-O Bent Gate Carabiner
Notes:
  • Add 6" to length for carabiner and o-ring
  • 53" Tether weighs 10 oz.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS Tow Tether
 
4.0

(based on 22 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (9)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (7)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

89%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Durable (12)
  • Lightweight (3)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Paddling (11)
  • Kayak / canoe / rafting (8)
  • Boating / sailing (3)
    • Chest Size:
    • Feels too small

       

      Feels true to size

       

      80% 

      (4 reviews)

      Feels too big

       
    • Was this a gift?:
    • No (19)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

Very Nice Tether

I tied this to the end of the NRS Bowline and used it to drag my kayak through shallow water on a week long trip down the Pecos River. Heavy shock cord did not...Read complete review

I tied this to the end of the NRS Bowline and used it to drag my kayak through shallow water on a week long trip down the Pecos River. Heavy shock cord did not stretch out but gave just enough to ease towing a loaded down boat over gravel and rocks.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

33" Best with a playboat

The smaller tether works fine with a playboat but is too short for a larger volume boat you may want to use for rescue. You'll have the tethered boat at your side and not...Read complete review

The smaller tether works fine with a playboat but is too short for a larger volume boat you may want to use for rescue. You'll have the tethered boat at your side and not behind you, it's difficult to paddle that way and less safe.

Reviewed by 22 customers

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Displaying reviews 1-5

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3.0

Stiff

By cheetah76

from NEPA

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Sturdy

Cons

  • Difficult To Store

Best Uses

  • Kayaking

Comments about NRS Tow Tether:

Strong and sturdy BUT a bit stiff and tough to tuck away. (my old one was a bit more flexible and came with a Velcro loop so you could fold it up and tuck it out of harms way. AKA high n tight so it didn't snag on things unexpectedly)

  • Was this a gift?:
  • No
 
1.0

Not suitable for saltwater use

By Tom

from Berkeley, CA

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Strong Good Webbing

Cons

  • Carabiner Corrodes

Best Uses

  • Freshwater Only

Comments about NRS Tow Tether:

I use this for ocean kayaking and rock gardening. It is clipped on to my long tow belt to use for short tows and as shock absorber for long tows. The unanodized aluminum carabiner corroded after about 10 outings despite freshwater rinses. Gate is frozen. All my other kayaking gear uses stainless steel (preferable) or anodized aluminum, and now I know why. If the carabiner were upgraded, this would be an excellent product.

  • Was this a gift?:
  • No
 
5.0

This rescue line is so helpful in returning boats to boaters

By Bob

from Central PA

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Compact Design
  • Easy To Use
  • Very Convenient

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Personal Watercraft

    Comments about NRS Tow Tether:

    Really worth the price!

    (1 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    3.0

    Needs a bigger biner

    By Pg

    from Indiana

    Pros

      Cons

      • Biner Too Small

      Best Uses

        Comments about NRS Tow Tether:

        The tether is solidly built, as one would expect from NRS. Clean, shrink wrap around the both ends covering the stitching. It will work well as a tow tether, but that's all. One of the best uses of a pigtail like this is to clip your paddle dot keep from losing it, but NRS didn't include a big enough carabiner. Other brands have biners sized to clip easily around a paddle shaft. NRS should update the hardware. It would be worth the extra cost, and would make it easy to keep track of your paddle during a rescue or to clip a friend's paddle while you help them out. I'm returning it to get one that performs this function.

        However, if you are just looking for a pigtail for towing, this will suit just fine.

         
        4.0

        There when you need it

        By Ak packrafter

        from Soldotna ak

        About Me Intermediate

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Good length
        • Releas Operates Smoothly

        Cons

        • No Paddlebeaner

        Best Uses

        • Boating
        • Canoeing
        • Pack Raft
        • Paddling

        Comments about NRS Tow Tether:

        If the caribeaner was a little bigger you could use it to save a buddies lost paddle
        As my friend often does for me
        It's a cheap up grade but it would be nice if it was included

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No

        Displaying reviews 1-5

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        Do you have questions about this product?

        Get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

        4 Questions | 21 Answers
        Displaying questions 1-4
        • NRS Tow Tether

          Q:

          What is the breaking strength of this tether?
          Asked on 7/15/2014 by Henry from Portland, OR

          4 answers

          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I'm not sure, but I've used it in training with several scenarios and haven't been able to destroy it yet. I'm 200 # / 6'-00". JB

            Answered on 7/24/2014 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I have never tried to break this tether. The Velcro will give out before it
            will break as well as your webbing on your vest. Its a bungee wrapped in
            webbing, the bungee won't fully extend due to the webbing. So, it's very
            solid. Hope this answers your question.

            Answered on 7/21/2014 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I have used this Tether for about 2 years now, mostly in boat rescue and
            have found it invaluable. I wish I would have bought it earlier.
            Jon

            Answered on 7/15/2014 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            It's not rated for falls or to be used as a PAS as far as I'm aware, but it's more than sufficient to tow a swimmer's boat.
            Sent from my iPhone

            Answered on 7/15/2014 by Wyze from Eugene, OR
        • NRS Tow Tether

          Q:

          Hello,

          Is there an official strength rating for this tether? Is it suitable for rescue tasks other than towing a boat? Live bait? In a pinch could one remove it and use it as an anchor / sling?

          Thanks!b
          Asked on 2/11/2014 by Ray from Alabama

          4 answers

          • Staff Reviewer

            A:

            Ray, the Tow Tether is designed expressly for in/on water use where a boater has it hooked to a quick-release belt on a rescue-style life jacket, and is using it to tow a loose boat or paddle. It is not strength rated for any other rescue operations.

            Answered on 2/12/2014 by Clyde from NRS
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            Hi Mark,
            Never...
            It is a tether and absolutely not to be used as anything else.
            I have taught numerous Swiftwater Rescue courses and using a tether for live-bait rescues works extremely well and has its place.
            I’m uncertain if NRS even documents a MBS for the tether.
            Any item that is used to anchor a live load that will be committed to gravity
            or in which failure of the anchor would be catastrophic must meet minimum performance
            standards for personal or general rescue.
            I.e.: my helicopter tether is similarly built but has a minimum breaking strength of 3800 pounds and my edge tether for teaching is 3600 pounds.
            It might be worth spending the money to buy one, hook it up to an anchor and dyno and start hauling with a come-along and see what happens.
            Take care,
            Garv

            Answered on 2/12/2014 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            Its certainly not long enough for a live bait setup, and as a climber I
            wouldn't feel comfortable using it as an anchor either. Super handy for
            towing, but I don't know if I'd use it for much else.

            Answered on 2/11/2014 by Wyze from Eugene, OR
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            You should ask NRS about official strength. I don't like it as a boat tow.
            I think it is too short. It is definitely meant to be used for live bait
            or for other rescue purposes using a Type V rescue PFD belt. You should
            absolutely understand how to use it in these circumstances from a
            swiftwater rescue class before attempting to do so.
            It seems like it would be much easier to carry a length of webbing with a
            biner around your waist for use as an anchor/sling.
            Personally, I don't like the tow tether at all. I use a tow strap stored
            in a pouch and connected to my belt. I can use it either as a tow
            (although I'd rather push a boat rather than tow) and I can use it for a
            live bait situation.

            Answered on 2/11/2014 by Ed from Palo Alto, CA
        • NRS Tow Tether

          Q:

          Would this work to flip a raft I am new into rafting and am wondering. If not what can be used to flip a raft
          Asked on 7/17/2013 by Ryguy

          5 answers

          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            Nope, too short and elastic is no good for this...look for a "flip line"

            Answered on 7/17/2013 by burnor from Duluth, MN
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            You need to get actual flip lines. NRS or Cascade outfitters sell them. A set attaches to one side of your raft with d rings.
            Kelly Milbrath

            Answered on 7/17/2013 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            Probably too short for most cases. Also, it is a bungy that would make it hard to pull the raft over. Better to use a strap, braided when being carried..

            Answered on 7/18/2013 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            Sorry, this tow tether will definitely not work to flip a raft. It is a rescue tool used by kayakers. I would recommend the all-in-one raft z-drag kit that NRS sells. Then, have someone show you how to use it.

            Answered on 7/20/2013 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I suppose it could be used as a flip line for a raft but it might be a little short, it's only about 5' when the elastic is fully extended. I used to work as a safety boater/guide for raft trips and typically, flip lines for a raft (depending in the size of the raft) were on the order of 6'-8' or a little longer. So if you want to use it as a flip line I suggest you a 4'-5' length of rope and see if that works for you as a flip line. Like I said there is quite a bit of stretch in the tether, to make more 'comfortable' when towing in whitewater; in the relaxed position the tether is 3" and fully stretched it is about 5".
            I don't guide anymore and usually I'm kayaking or canoeing so typically I use the NRS Tow Tether (a.k.a. Cow's Tail) to tow a swimmer to safety or retrieve an errant boat. If used for towing, it should be worn ONLY with a quick-release "Type V - Rescue PFD" or at the very least with a 2''-wide (minimum) quick-release waist belt. I strongly advise practicing towing and releasing in quiet water of a lake until you feel comfortable before attempting to tow in whitewater. You don't want to be tied to someone (or something) that you can't get rid of when or if 'things go badly'.

            Answered on 7/20/2013 by Anonymous
        • NRS Tow Tether

          Q:

          For salt water use. If one where to have a rescue vest. would it be a good Idea to use this NRS tow tether to attach yourself to your kayak with say a 15' or so line in order to keep your kayak from getting away from you in the event you where thrown from the kayak in the surf or for any other reason. In other words is it a good or bad idea in general to attach yourself to a kayak for safety reasons? Thank you
          John
          Asked on 11/11/2012 by John D from San Bruno California

          8 answers

          • A:

            Depends... In the rough stuff, like surfing or rock gardening, you may want to get away from your kayak, so no. On long crossing, solo distance touring, etc., yes. I use it for this purpose. Go over and have to swim for some reason, and the wind can take your kayak pretty quick if it's right-side-up, and you lose your hold on it. You won't catch it, and losing your kayak can mean losing your life when off shore. Just make sure it's attached to a quick release, like on a rescue vest.

            Answered on 12/12/2014 by Matt from Okinawa Japan
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            Hey John, from a safety stand point I would not recommend being tethered to the kayak for the simple reason of not being able to get free from it in the event of an emergency.
            Hope this helps,
            Jake.

            Answered on 11/12/2012 by Anonymous
          • Staff Reviewer

            A:

            You could but we wouldn't recommend it. A tow tether is best used to tow another kayak. This one is most commonly used by whitewater kayakers to bring a boat to shore after a swim.

            Answered on 11/12/2012 by Clyde from NRS
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I used this in saltwater for about 3-4 days and I wouldn't recommend it. It took a fair amount of WD40 to get the carabineer to self-latch again. I think the salt gets into the spring and messes it up. I'd look for a carabeener that was specifically designed for salt water use or expect to routinely clean and maintain this design. I only whitewater kayak, so I can't speak to what protocol and normal safety procedures are for sea kayaking. In whitewater kayaking, you don't want to be attached to a boat like that unless it's an emergency and you've got support people to help with the rescue. I would just worry about the rope getting entangled on something, or the boat pulling you in a direction you wouldn't want to go, or something like that.

            Answered on 11/11/2012 by scottworth from Cincinnati, OH
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            No, a tow tether is for towing. If surfing, you and your boat, if
            separated, would not travel at the same speed. You could get caught up in
            the line and dragged under or just tangled up. This is the reason I don't
            use a paddle leash anymore.

            Answered on 11/11/2012 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I know that longer tow tethers exist that are sea-kayaking specific. I
            believe they should be offered by NRS as well but are sold as
            quick-release waist bags. I am not a sea kayaker so I can't speak to the
            wisdom of attaching yourself to your kayak.
            Casey

            Answered on 11/11/2012 by Anonymous
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            It is a bad idea for any line or tether to be attached to you in the surf
            zone. Coming out of the boat is a somewhat frequent occurrence in surf but
            the chances of getting entwined in the tether or line is almost certain if
            you do. This can be a very dangerous situation. It is best to hang on to
            your equipment, keeping your boat between you and the shore so that you
            don't get run over by the laden boat when the next wave hits.

            Answered on 11/11/2012 by Ed from Palo Alto, CA
          • VERIFIED BUYER

            A:

            I would never attach myself to anything unless I had a "quick release" to free myself. A paddle can actually help you in a swim situation. The kayak, if overturned becomes more of a liability to you than a help (especially when it fills with water). Of course, I have no saltwater experience; I'm only speaking from a white-water perspective.
            Jimmy Jones

            Answered on 11/12/2012 by Anonymous
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