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NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

$4.00–$14.95

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Item: 60001.01  |  Product Details »

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Absolutely the best cam straps you can buy! The NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Strap has been the first choice of rafters, kayakers, canoeists and other outdoor folks for over 35 years.
  • Our 1" wide polypropylene webbing has a tensile strength of 1,500 pounds, so you can lash down your gear with confidence.
  • We also soak the webbing in our proprietary UV protectant for long life in the sunny outdoors.
  • Two center-mounted stainless-steel springs give our cam buckle a stronger, more secure grip on the webbing.
  • The length of each NRS tie-down strap is woven right into the webbing, so there's never any guesswork when choosing the right size for the job.
  • You can buy single straps of each length. We also offer a pair (two straps) of the 9', 12', 15' and 20' lengths as a purchase option.
  • A waterproof 1" x 3" tag near the buckle gives you a place to write your name and contact info to prove to your buddy that it's your strap, NOT his.
  • Rafters, kayakers, canoeists and other water folks love these burly cargo straps.
  • Yes, they're the gold standard for boaters, but savvy people have found literally hundreds of other uses for them.
  • You'll want these straps for your boating gear bag, car trunk, truck bed, ATV, camper... everywhere.
  • Ask any boater and they'll tell you, "You can never have too many."

Product Reviews

  (323)

Related Videos

  • video: Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage
    Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage
    Length:0:49
  • video: How to Organize Straps
    How to Organize Straps
    Length:0:42
Lashing Capacity: 1,500 lbs.
Features:
  • Strap length woven into polypropylene webbing
  • Buckle has 2 center-mounted stainless-steel springs
  • 1" x 3" waterproof label for contact information
  • Webbing treated with UV protectant
Notes:
  • All strap lengths are measured in feet.

video: Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage

Quick Tips | How to Roll a Strap for Storage (0:49)

Tired of that tangled mess of NRS straps in your garage? Don't worry, there's a better way. In this Quick Tips video, we show you how to roll your straps for tidy storage. It's simple and easy to do, and will make finding the right strap when you need it much easier.

video: How to Organize Straps

How to Organize Straps (0:42)

As you accumulate a bunch of NRS straps (which you will), keeping them organized will save you a lot of frustration. This video shows one method, putting each of the different lengths on a separate strap.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps
 
4.9

(based on 323 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (289)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (28)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

99%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Rugged (128)
  • Functional (126)
  • Lightweight (64)
  • Compact (50)
  • Quick drying (40)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Kayak / canoe / rafting (98)
  • Boating / sailing (80)
  • Rivers (63)
  • Day trip (59)
  • Rapids paddling (48)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Advanced (45), Intermediate (28), Professional (14), Beginner (4)
    • Was this a gift?:
    • No (285), Yes (18)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

You can never have enough of these

I never stop finding reasons to use these short (2') straps. On and off the water, they seem to be used constantly. They are mandatory for my cataraft, but are used...Read complete review

I never stop finding reasons to use these short (2') straps. On and off the water, they seem to be used constantly. They are mandatory for my cataraft, but are used in many other applications. Even if you don't have a cat, I recommend buying a bunch of these 2 foot goodies.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

Cost cutting ?

The straps are probably OK, but they are made of a thinner material than NRS straps I have had for 10 + years. Just a bit disappointed when i opened the package and found...Read complete review

The straps are probably OK, but they are made of a thinner material than NRS straps I have had for 10 + years. Just a bit disappointed when i opened the package and found them to be them the lighter weight material. I can get light weight straps anywhere, but expected the same robust straps from NRS the I got in the past.

Reviewed by 323 customers

Displaying reviews 1-5

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5.0

Tie down straps

By Jed

from Frederick MD

About Me Intermediate

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Cleans Easily
  • Compact
  • Functional
  • Lightweight
  • Quick Drying
  • Rugged

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Kayaking

    Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

    Excellent quality, easy threading, double spring a deal maker.

    • Was this a gift?:
    • No
     
    5.0

    theses straps are the best I've found. enough said

    By Dan

    from Davis, CA

    About Me Intermediate

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • easiest cam to use (thread into the buckle)
    • Functional
    • Rugged

    Cons

      Best Uses

        Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

        straps down anything. lots of size choices so you shouldn't have strap tails everywhere.

         
        5.0

        I would buy this product again and again, and I have!

        By Boom Boom

        from Garden Valley, idaho

        About Me Beginner

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Functional
        • Lightweight
        • Quick Drying
        • Rugged

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Boating

          Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

          work great to hold the frame my cat!

          • Was this a gift?:
          • No
           
          3.0

          Cost cutting ?

          By Harobedguy

          from Leola, PA

          About Me Intermediate

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Functional

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Kayaking

            Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

            The straps are probably OK, but they are made of a thinner material than NRS straps I have had for 10 + years. Just a bit disappointed when i opened the package and found them to be them the lighter weight material. I can get light weight straps anywhere, but expected the same robust straps from NRS the I got in the past.

            Service and delivery comments:

            Excellent

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No
             
            5.0

            I drove 650 mile w kayak. Didn't have to tighten straps once

            By Jorjan

            from Missouri

            About Me Intermediate

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Functional
            • Lightweight
            • Rugged

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Kayaking

              Comments about NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps:

              I hate ratchet straps. These are so easy to use. I can't imagine ever transporting my kayak without them!! Buy 3 sets. Give one to a friend.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Displaying reviews 1-5

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              Do you have questions about this product?

              Get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

              18 Questions | 252 Answers
              Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                What makes these straps any better than the competitor's straps?
                Asked on 3/11/2016 by Lazy Boater from Washington

                20 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I don't know which competitor straps you are referring to, but I have compared NRS straps with a few similar generic type straps one would buy at a hardware store. 1), NRS straps webbing is very durable and hold up to the environment, where the generic straps get soft, faded, and frayed. 2), NRS buckles will outlast even their own webbing. 3), NRS manufacture straps for boat makers like Vespoli USA Racing for all of their equipment. If a company like Vespoli uses and trusts these straps, then you can too.
                  M. Stilwell

                  Answered on 3/14/2016 by Big Mike from Alexandria, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They seem to have a long life. We own more than 150 of them and think that they are a good value.

                  Answered on 3/14/2016 by John from Boston,Ma
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Heavier webbing material that doesn't fray nearly as quickly, better corrosion resistant buckle where the spring stays strong. I've tried all the cheapest, these are better but yeah, spendy...

                  Answered on 3/12/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They. are tough and won't break easily. Buckles are secure too. That's why outfitters and long tie e boaters use them

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I'm not familiar w competitors straps but the NRS straps are awesome. Get the blue ones not color coded because they are not as strong. Blue ones will hold up to strapping canoes down on canoe trailer. Very easy to use.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  These straps are clearly labeled with the length, so when you have a basket
                  full of straps and are getting ready to roll out your raft, you can easily
                  grab the ones you need without having to measure and compare lengths. I use
                  these straps for everything.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The strap material holds up well under the punishment of
                  wet/dry/sandy/high-UV conditions; the nylon hardly ever frays or gets
                  stiff; the buckle releases the strap easily when you want it to, but
                  doesn't slide when it shouldn't, and has a good spring tension (not too
                  stiff or too loose); reasonably priced compared to any competition I've seen

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The price.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I have used yakima straps that came with a kit. The NRS straps were thicker and more durable. I have had the same NRS straps that I have used to mount my kayaks for over 10 years and they have not torn or frayed. They have been many long trips at highway speeds and exposed often to rain.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The cam has a wider opening making it easier to thread the strap thru. I personally own at least 30 of these straps from 2'-12' I love them.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They have the length marked on them and they have a name tag. Otherwise the same.
                  Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S® 5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  In a word, quality!
                  Sent from my iPad

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by carldcg from Phoenix, AZ
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They don't fray or get brittle with sun exposure.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by bonedoc from billings mt
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I've never tried "the competition", not knowing exactly who they'd be.I have used many NRS products without any complaint, which is much more than I can say for many other suppliers, so I'm not about to make any comparisons!  These are good, and they work for me.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by SFBaygirl from SF Bay area CA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  High visible stitched length on strap. When you get many as I have over the years makes it nice to sort.
                  Sent from Outlook Mobile<https://aka.ms/blhgte>

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I have used others, but I find the quality of the webbing or even the metal cam do not compare.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  These straps have always served our family well. They are very strong
                  and last for years. I really don't know much about competitor's straps.
                  Sorry.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I can say that I have used these straps for years and hundreds of miles without any problems. I bought my first set in
                  1986 and they are still in use! If you want to try a competitor...go for it.

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Still using mine 20 years later, no exaggeration. And I use them a lot. The buckles have never slipped, not once. (I've had cheaper straps do so.). Very strong; don't stretch. And the straps have their length written on them, repeated along the whole strap. Or at least mine do. Turns out that's super useful when you're trying to grab the straps you need for a particular use. Vert often, they get gathered in a bunch. Without the numbers, would be hell to pull out a 9 footer, etc.
                  In short, excellent product.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Better buckles than some of the cheapie ones I've picked up. These work smoother and last forever.
                  Michael Stewart
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 3/11/2016 by Anonymous
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                Why aren't these good straps made in more widths? A wider-than-1" strap would be friendlier to a composite canoe hull...$.01
                Asked on 1/15/2016 by Steve who paddles out in the sticks from Bangor, ME

                19 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The 1" straps have a very high tensile strength, more than enough to secure
                  car top boats. They need not and should not be tightened to the point that
                  they deform the hull. Wider straps are available from many sources, usually
                  with ratchet buckles.
                  Rich Stevens
                  Treasurer
                  Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
                  <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

                  Answered on 1/26/2016 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I am going to guess that a wider strap will be less easy to tie off. I use long straps so that I have extra length for more possible situations but then you always have to deal with the tail after you strap down the canoe. I have three different boats all with different hull materials and I haven't had any damage to the hulls from the straps and I don't put the buckle on the hull. That just seems like a problem waiting to happen. Eric

                  Answered on 1/20/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They are also made in 1.5" widths or you can always use padding to increase the surface area and disperse the point loading.

                  Answered on 1/19/2016 by John from Boston,Ma
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  NRS use to have 1 1/2" HD straps and buckles with a higher weight rating. In my opinion, any wider widths would be over kill for what they are intended for. Dont know your hauling/rack options are, but rail placement for gunwales is important. If canoe can rest on rails outside tumblehome (narrower section) straps just need to be snug. No need to really crank them down super tight for secure ride. I include a bow line and stern line for long highway trips. All my boats are poly or Royalex, but your composite boat will be fine.

                  Answered on 1/18/2016 by Boomer from Birmingham AL
                • A:

                  While that would be nice if you just make sure that you have it secure but don't over tension the 1" ones they should work fine. I've used these for years strapping down kayaks and hauling them on the road at 75 mph and never had an issue. Don't use anything else to secure my kayaks.

                  Answered on 1/18/2016 by Roy from Frederick, MD
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Hey Steve the NRS HD straps come in one and a half inch wide as well. They are listed on there web sight.
                  Walter
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 1/17/2016 by Walter from Arkansas
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Steve: Good point. It seems to me that there might be a demand for wider
                  straps, They do have 1 ½” straps and I have a pair. They’re good and
                  sturdy.
                  http://www.nrs.com/product/1446/nrs-15-padded-straps
                  Frank
                  Frank J Perruccio
                  Surf Dog Computer Services
                  4309 Silas Hutchinson Dr.
                  Chantilly, VA 20151-1325

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Surf Dog from Chantilly, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Hey Steve
                  NRS does sell 1.5" straps, and you can get rubber "bumpers" to protect your
                  rig from the metal buckle. That might work for ya.
                  Craig

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Have you seen the 1 1/2 inch straps? They are online.

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I was wrong, the larger ones are 1.5” wide.

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Anonymous
                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Steve, you are probably looking for our 1.5" HD Straps, Item # 60006.01; they are even stronger.

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  NRS makes 1.5 in straps

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They do make wider straps. They make a 1.5" strap. I haul composite Olympic rowing shells and you don't need anything wider than 1.5". There are companies that will make you a custom strap, but it costs big $$$$.

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Big Mike from Alexandria, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Steve -
                  I don't know.  I actually thought there were wider straps.  Seems like a question for the manufacturer.  At the same time, I've been using these straps for over 20 years to tie down kayaks, including a composite kayak, and have found it doesn't take much tightening to secure the kayaks.  The straps need to be snug, but not real tight.  There are are canoe stops, which I would recommend, that fit on racks to help secure the canoe.  If still concerned about movement you can tie down both ends of the canoe to the front and rear of your vehicle.
                  Mike
                  Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The straps are 1" because they are primarily designed & designated for use
                  on inflatable craft - attaching pontoons & accessories to 1" D rings. They
                  weren't originally intended to be used as canoe tie-downs, but they are very
                  secure straps. NRS does make similar padded 1-1/2" padded canoe & kayak
                  tie-down straps (http://www.nrs.com/product/1446/nrs-15-padded-straps).

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Jim from Pacific Northwest
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use the wider inch and a half to two inch straps with my kayak. They keep the boat from moving around at high speeds on the highway. They also have a bigger and stronger buckle.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Steve,
                  They do make them in 1 1/2" as well. Go here:
                  http://www.nrs.com/product/1445/nrs-15-hd-tie-down-straps
                  Brad
                  Brad Snow
                  s/v Aldonza

                  Answered on 1/16/2016 by Padeen from Alaska
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The normal application is to double the strap back over the craft thus reducing the overall pressure, and increasing the surface contact with the vehicle. I carry a bag of various lengths in my car, and use the on everything from the 21' composite sea kayak to my plastic white water boats.
                  Used correctly I do not think anyone makes a better strap for this type of application.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 1/15/2016 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They are just the strongest straps on the market. The buckles aren't protected either. You can get padded ones for a higher price.
                  Kathy

                  Answered on 1/15/2016 by Anonymous
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                I don't see the 1" padded straps on your site. Do you still sell them?
                Asked on 11/30/2015 by Brad from Hoffman Estates, IL

                1 answer

                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Brad, they've been replaced by an improved product, the Buckle Bumper Strap, Item # 60003.02. The bumper wraps around the buckle for excellent gear protection.

                  Answered on 12/1/2015 by Clyde from NRS
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                Would a "pair" mean a short strap with the cam buckle a done long strap with a tapered end to fit in the short cam buckle? I assume each price comes with a stitched loop end as well?
                Asked on 11/16/2015 by Steve from St. Louis, MO

                16 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Not the shorter ones. There are longer ones that do. The short ones are just like illustrated, cam at one end and tapered end on the other. Look at the pair listing to see which ones are as you describe.

                  Answered on 11/18/2015 by River Rat Dave from Yakima
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  No. A cam strap is one piece strap with a buckle on the end. It works well and only 1 strap needed per tie down. Kathy
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 11/17/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I've not ever bought a "pair" but the tie-down straps referred to do not
                  have a stitched loop at either end. The strap ends so you can attach it
                  to the buckle. There's a buckle and tag for writing your name on the
                  other end.
                  Hope that helps.
                  Robin

                  Answered on 11/17/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The straps shown are just the strap and cam.
                  I can't tell if you are asking about the common strap or the loop strap (commonly used on rafts with frames).
                  Check the loop strap image to see if that's what you want rather than a regular strap.

                  Answered on 11/17/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The link included in this question is for Tie-Down Straps. If you want
                  loops on the end, they are called Loop Straps, and here is the link to the
                  appropriate product: http://www.nrs.com/product/1444/nrs-1-loop-straps.
                  Greg Skomp
                  8280 W Eastman Pl
                  Lakewood, CO 80227

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Outdoor Athlete from Colorado
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Steve,
                  I have never seen these straps referred to as a "pair", they are single
                  straps which include the buckle. The exception would be if you are looking
                  at the cooler straps, which are 2 pieces and made to attach to both sides of
                  the frame with a stitched loop. The other end is either the cam, or the
                  tapered strap. Those do come as pairs, one side with the cam, the other
                  without.
                  Hope that helped

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Steve,
                  I don't understand your question. These straps are sold individually. As indicated they come in a variety of pre-cut lengths. Each strap has a cam fastener sewn to one end. The free end of the strap is cut at a bias so as to make it easier to insert the free end into the cam. If you are not sure what length you need for a given application, by to the long side, cut at an angle to desired length, then whip the cut with an open flame to prevent the fabric from unraveling. Hope this helps.

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by carldcg from Phoenix, AZ
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  No, The looped straps are different/specific. The one inch loop strap (
                  http://www.nrs.com/product/1444/nrs-1-loop-straps) a pair simply means two
                  of whatever you are ordering. Most boaters us the straps in pairs on their
                  car so NRS tried to make the ordering simple. If you are looking for the
                  loop straps, and one strap consist of your previous description, then use
                  the NRS link above. Happy Boating. cm

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I think I understand you (with typos)
                  The product you list here (NRS 1" Tie-Down Strap) is a single unit, with
                  one buckle on one end, used as a there-and-back-again tie-down, with the
                  strap the same width throughout. This is used primarily for canoe and
                  kayak tie-downs, as well as securing gear and gear netting on rafts. A
                  "Pair" must mean two straps of similar size and strength, though the
                  website is rather ambiguous about this.
                  The other style, which you may have confused with the above, is their
                  "NRS 1" Loop Strap". It comes in two pieces with the buckle on a
                  shorter strap, though not right at the loop, and a longer strap. Each
                  of the pieces has a sewn loop at one end. There is no taper as the
                  buckle can fit anywhere on the non-buckle strap, making it useful for
                  the widest applications. This strap is used primarily for tying down
                  raft coolers and other raft boxes, which are between two frame rails and
                  access would be less convenient if a looped strap were used.
                  Brad Snow
                  s/v Aldonza

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Padeen from Alaska
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  If you are talking about the loop straps for tying off around a pole, yes, there are two straps with sewn loops one long and one short with the cam buckle. They work great.

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Big Mike from Alexandria, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I'm pretty sure a "pair" simply means you simply get two straps of that
                  length. The straps have the buckle sewn to one side. The other option would
                  be loop straps: http://www.nrs.com/product/1444/nrs-1-loop-straps

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Anonymous
                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Steve we offer singles of each of the lengths, as well as pairs (two) of the 9'-20' lengths. It's a little cheaper to order pairs of those lengths than to buy two singles. I think what you're describing might be our Loop Straps - http://www.nrs.com/product/1444/nrs-1-loop-straps - Please let us know if we haven't properly answered your question - 800.635.5202.

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They are one piece straps. If it's advertised as a pair then there are two
                  of them

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I am assuming a pair means 2 straps, which you would need to secure a kayak. Hence, if you don’t already own another strap, then you need to buy a pair to secure your kayak.
                  Each strap has a buckle at one end and the tapered strap without a buckle at the other end. You wrap one strap around the crossbars and the front of your kayak (and pull taper end through buckle and cinch down) and a second strap around the crossbars and the rear of your kayak (and pull taper end through buckle and cinch down). There are probably you-tube videos showing you how to secure the kayak with the straps if you are not sure.

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Each strap, of this type pictured, includes a buckle end attached in a sewn loop at one end and a plain strap cut at an angle at the other end. Two of these is a pair of straps. Buy the proper length as length in feet is woven into the strap.

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I don't see the word "pair" in the description. You buy it by a strap at a
                  time. One strap comes with a buckle on one end and a diagonally stitched on
                  the other end, so that you can wrap it around something and secure with the
                  buckle.

                  Answered on 11/16/2015 by Anonymous
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                Does this material float, not the buckle?
                Asked on 10/31/2015 by Gary

                15 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I'd say the strap material is buoyancy neutral.
                  Nancy

                  Answered on 11/7/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  For a short time.

                  Answered on 11/2/2015 by John from Boston,Ma
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  In my experience it doesn't really, especially once it's wet. It may be neutrally buoyant at best. When a strap tail is dangling in the water I've never noticed it floating particularly well.

                  Answered on 11/1/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The Material floats but is not super bouyant

                  Answered on 11/1/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Yes. The strap material is polypropylene, not nylon, so it does float.
                  Rich Stevens
                  Treasurer
                  Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
                  <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Nylon does not float. Polypropylene or Spectra do.
                  Frank J Perruccio
                  Surf Dog Computer Services
                  4309 Silas Hutchinson Dr.
                  Chantilly, VA 20151-1325

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Surf Dog from Chantilly, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  No, maybe if it's dry it will.

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Anonymous
                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Gary, polypropylene has a specific gravity of 0.91 (water's is 1.0), so yes, it floats.

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  yes
                  Alan

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  yes they float

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Yes
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  It is only slightly positive bouyant but it does float without the buckle.
                  Walter Felton
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I doubt it. But even if it did, the buckle would sink it if you dropped it overboard.

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by River Rat Dave from Yakima
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  It does not float, to my knowledge.

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by SFBaygirl from SF Bay area CA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Sorry don't know...I use short straps to hold water bottle, throw bag on my kayak and of course those float ....seems like the strap material would float but it does seem to absorb water and so at some point when waterlogged might tend to sink. Going on a kayak run later today and will try to observe the strap more closely .
                  Deana

                  Answered on 10/31/2015 by Anonymous
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                Should I use 303 aerosoace protectant or fabric guard on these straps? I read that the aerospace protestant can be used on polypropylene.
                Asked on 10/11/2015 by river rat Ryan from Nevada

                12 answers

                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Hi, Ryan, I apologize for the delay in getting back to you. I wanted to check with the manufacturer and it took some time to get the info. They say that 303 Protectant, Item # 38751.01, is safe to use. However, they do not recommend using 303 Fabric Guard, Item # 38750.01. Be aware that when we make our webbing, we put it through two baths of a very effective UV protectant treatment. This will protect your straps from sun damage for a long time

                  Answered on 10/14/2015 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  303 wouldn't hurt them. It probably won't make them last too much longer. I
                  find in general by the time my straps are showing fading from the sun it is
                  time to replace them anyway. Abrasion is the main reason I have had straps
                  break on me.

                  Answered on 10/13/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I have used this product for 15+ years and see no reason or need to treat
                  the straps in any way. If you are using in and around salt water, I would
                  rinse them before storage (dip in hot water with a little Simple Green as a
                  surfactant)

                  Answered on 10/13/2015 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I'm sure you could use it, but there is no need, the straps last forever.

                  Answered on 10/12/2015 by Rafter from Alberton, MT
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I never use anything, I guess you might get longer life. The only thing I have thrown away was ones that got torn from accidents. Rock rubs or sharp edges.

                  Answered on 10/12/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Why? They might last a bit longer, but mine are used almost weekly and still good. They use them on the rafts on Colorado River and get lots of sun, water daily
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Absolutely NOT. I've had some straps for twenty-five years, have put no
                  chemical voodoo medicine on them and they have kept their strength.
                  Conversely, 303 was unable to keep the Columbia or Challenger disasters
                  from happening.
                  Your choice.
                  Brad
                  Brad Snow
                  s/v Aldonza

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by Padeen from Alaska
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  My straps don't degrade due to sun exposure. They just wear out. I imagine 303 would help them last. I use 303 on my car's dash, too.

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Hi Ryan:
                  I use these straps for sea kayaking and have had them for several years now. They have never been treated with 303 and have taken a beating. Buckles work great, even when sandy. I don't think a dose of 303 would hurt, but not sure if it would help. Straps are great!
                  Best-
                  Wendell
                  Sent from my iPad

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by Wendell from San Francisco Bay Area
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  What is your goal in 'protecting' the straps? My experience with them is that they are used in and out of water, which cleans off most boat-related grease, grime, food, etc.  In other words, no 'protection' needed; the straps never seem to fray or get destroyed.  If not for river use, and you want an easier cleaning strap, this might work. However, these straps keep their distinct colors long into their lives, so 'fade protection' is probably not necessary.

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by SFBaygirl from SF Bay area CA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I don't. Just keep them out of the sun when not in use.

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  My choice would be the 303 Protectant. This product is effective on most all plastics that are commonly used for sporting equipment.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by carldcg from Phoenix, AZ
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                Can you tell me what the buckles are made of? I know it says the springs are stainless. Thank you.
                Asked on 10/2/2015 by Neil from Rhode Island

                18 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The buckles are of galvanized metal. I have had these straps for years of river use and have never had a buckle or spring rust or fail. The straps over time in the sun will wear out but that will take many many years of use.

                  Answered on 10/11/2015 by REM from Colorado Springs, CO
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I believe the buckles are cast. Will not rust. I have some for over 15 years. Heavy use. Best out there.

                  Answered on 10/9/2015 by Boomer from Birmingham AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I think it's some kind of pot metal (cast in a mold) I don't think it's stainless, I've had some of my NRS straps for decades now, and I have some other from another mfg. and the NRS ones have held up a lot better--they don't all look stainless anymore, but they hold like they are supposed to. Dave

                  Answered on 10/5/2015 by Big Dave from Burley, ID
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Some kind of cast metal. But nrs straps are the best! Period! I'bought all brands. The length stitched into strap is worth the buy alone. I have 15 year old straps still working. Just rinse them good and clamps keep working. Five stars!

                  Answered on 10/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Neil, the springs and the pin the cam lever pivots on are stainless steel. The remainder of the buckle is made of zinc.

                  Answered on 10/3/2015 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I’m afraid I do not know what the buckles are made of but as a long time user (20 years) I can tell you that they will hold up to the intended purposes which is tying down boats. I have had NRS straps over the years and some of them have probably been with me most of that time. Get the length you need and get other lengths too. I always have 9’, 15’ and 20’ on hand. I routinely transported 2-4 kayaks up to 150 miles one way and all shuttles in between as well as 9 hour trips to the Southeast. They do their job.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The main body of the buckle and the catch is made of some type of non-corrosive no-magnetic metal, probably aluminium. The rocker pin is magnetic so it's probably zinc plated steel. They are of high enough quality for whitewater rafting. They do a fine job.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I can't, though I can say that it is not stainless steel. However,
                  I'm very abusive with my gear and I've never had one break or wear out
                  in the thirty or so that I've owned over the last 25 years. I have,
                  however, broken a windshield with one. They also don't leave residue on
                  painted surfaces unless they rub continually.
                  For the last several years I've been using them in an ocean sailing
                  environment and they are prone to salting up over time, making them
                  stiff or even unworkable until they are thoroughly cleaned. This
                  doesn't stop their usefulness, but requires, like most other sailing
                  tools, regular attention.
                  Brad
                  Brad Snow
                  s/v Aldonza

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Padeen from Alaska
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They appear to be some sort of non-ferrous alloy. They will not corrode, but
                  I have seen them develop some sort of minor white corrosion product. Even
                  then, they operate just fine.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Neil,
                  I think it is aluminum. They don't rust. I have tried many different straps over the years, and for about the past 15 years, I will only buy the NRS straps.
                  Bob
                  Sent from somewhere, wishing I was in the Balkans!

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They appear to be a heavy aluminum alloy. I've had them on a truck rack all
                  year long for many years without any sign of rust or corrosion. The straps
                  appear to be very UV resistant as well. I have yet to have an NRS strap
                  break or degrade to the point of replacement.
                  Rich Stevens
                  Treasurer
                  Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
                  <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I don’t know what metal the buckles are made of, you would have to ask NRS, but mine, which I’ve been using for at least 10 years have never rusted, and my use is tying down salt water kayaks. I spray a little wd-40 on the springs every week to keep them from freezing up.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Hi, Neil:
                  I'm not a metallurgist, so I can't tell you what kind of metal the buckles are made of. But I can tell you that they don't seem to discolor, tarnish, or corrode as quickly as the tie downs from other companies and have been very reliable. I've been happy with how long they last. 
                  Best-Wendell

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Wendell from San Francisco Bay Area
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Some sort of moderately strong pot metal. We have more than 200 straps and have only broken one buckle and that was not under load. Under load they have never failed.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by John from Boston,Ma
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I've used NRS straps for some time on everything. I have never put a magnet on them to see if they are stainless but they hold up well even in salt water applications. They darken a bit but no rust so far. My straps are in Idaho and I'm not now so I can't check at this time. I would and will order additional as needed.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  They are cast metal, not sure if it's aluminum or Zinc, probably aluminum.
                  They are quite strong, nothing is unbreakable but I have never seen on of
                  these break.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I don't know, but they hold up well after years of service. They don't rust
                  Alan

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  It reads on the specs section of their website that the buckle is zinc. I attached a screen shot at the bottom of this email.

                  Answered on 10/2/2015 by ADB from St Charles IL
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                How long should tie down straps be for a 16' 35" wide canoe?
                Asked on 7/7/2015 by Laplander from Michigan

                21 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12' straps work for almost any canoe, so are the most logical ones to
                  use. They can be a bit long with a narrow canoe, or if the rack rails
                  are far apart, leading to strapping the canoe closer to the skinny part,
                  so just wrap the extra to keep it from flapping and/or causing wind drag.
                  Best strapping method: Forward strap first - Run strap under the bar
                  away from the close side of the vehicle. Bring both ends up over the
                  hull without twists or a full wrap on the bar, so the strap can slide
                  freely around the bar, making one or the other end longer at the near
                  side of the canoe, being careful not to cross the strap as it comes over
                  the hull. With the buckle a foot above the near bar, make a double wrap
                  with the non-buckle end around the close end of the bar (a clove hitch),
                  making sure the far loop and the near hitch are snug to the gunwales
                  (except for extreme tumblehome). Now engage the buckle with the free
                  end of the strap and, while insuring both sides of the strap are taking
                  the shortest path over the hull, snug the strap to your desired
                  firmness; tight enough to keep the gunwales from sliding on the bar, but
                  not crushing them or the hull.
                  Next, run your bow line (Don't EVER transport a canoe without a
                  secure forward line!) to its anchor on or around the bumper, or through
                  a hood loop (NOT the forward bar!) and make this taught, firmly seating
                  the canoe hull into the front strap. Only after this step do you add
                  the rear strap, following the same procedure you used for the front
                  strap, making sure it runs free around the far bar loop, isn't crossed
                  or twisted coming over the hull, leaving the buckle a foot from the bar,
                  wrapping the free end, and snugging the strap up, making sure the strap
                  connections to the bar are close to the gunwales.
                  A rear line isn't essential but some prefer to be redundant wrt
                  safety. If you do wish to run a rear line, insure that the line doesn't
                  put a forward pull on the hull by tying to a thwart ahead of the secure
                  point instead of the end of the canoe if the end of the canoe sticks out
                  beyond the rear secure point.
                  Don't paddle too far beyond your skill level and have fun!
                  Brad
                  Brad Snow
                  s/v Aldonza

                  Answered on 7/19/2015 by Padeen from Alaska
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Well, that would depend on the width of your vehicle and where the tie down anchors are located, wouldn’t it? So twice the linear distance anchor to anchor over your canoe plus about a foot or two for tensioning. Extra is better than not enough and any loose strap can be daisy chained.

                  Answered on 7/12/2015 by Trashman from Arnold, CA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  The simple answer requires a question. What do you plan to strap this canoe
                  onto?
                  The canoes size is relevant only in relation to the whole. I suggest you put
                  the canoe on the vehicle (and rack or whatever you plan to use) and then use
                  rope to estimate the length required. Add 6 inches to a foot for slack and
                  maneuvering and you know how long they need to be.
                  You will probably need front and rear straps with S hooks as well, as a pair
                  of plan buckle straps to secure the boat to the vehicle. You can do it with
                  less, but unless you want to share my experience of watching a kayak fly off
                  my truck at 45 MPH - I don't recommend it.

                  Answered on 7/9/2015 by Wild in the Tenn Woods from Oak Ridge, Tenn
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12’ works fine when using Yakima cross bars, looping the strap around the
                  protruding end of one bar, then over the top of a 16’ Bell Morning Star
                  canoe, then looping around the protruding end of the opposite bar. You
                  need to tie up about 1-2’ of excess strap once tightened.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12’ should work if you are strapping boat down closer to the bow and stern.
                  15’ would be better if you are strapping boat down closer to the middle (as that section of the boat is wider)
                  You can always cut the strap to the length that works best for you.
                  If you do cut, cut strap at an diagonal (angled at the end). Then, burn the cut part of strap with a lighter and while it’s still hot, pull strap between two unopened coke cans, or anything flat and smooth. This will keep your cut end nice and smooth - will feed through buckle easier this way.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Paddler from AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I always get 15' straps, You can always fold the excess, but once you are too short, you are out of luck. They are the best straps ever. Never shorten them. You might need them for a bow line to secure your boat to the car. Worth the extra money.
                  kathy

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I usually use 9 foot for kayaks, I'd suggest 12 foot for canoes.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Always buy long. Can't make them longer! Always depends on your orientation
                  and tie down approach.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Chris from Taunton River, MA
                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  This article shows the common way of strapping a canoe or kayak to a roof rack - http://www.nrs.com/kayaks/tiedown.asp - Measure that distance over your boat and order strap length accordingly. Tie off loose strap ends to keep them from flapping.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  It depends on where your boat lands on your rack. I have three Mad River Explorers (37"W at widest point) and use 12' NRS straps. Bars on my canoe trailer are 10 feet apart. Provides enough "tail" to pull snug and secure. If bars are close together might need 15', as I did with an old truck rack years ago. To simplify, you can figure where your canoe will rest on your Yakima/Thule bars (or homemade ones) Take a rope or string and loop it under bar and over canoe, and under bar again, leaving about a foot extra. Now measure what you have. Probably close to 12 feet.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Boomer from Birmingham AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Assuming you will be strapping the canoe to rack crossbars, place the canoe
                  on the ground. At the approximate points where the straps will go, measure
                  from the ground on one side to the ground on the other side. Double this
                  value and add at least two feet. Pick the strap that is this length or
                  longer. This also assumes that you will be using the usual method of running
                  the straps from the near side, across the canoe, around the cross bar on the
                  far side, and back again around the near side of the cross bar. Don't forget
                  to provide front and rear tie downs as well.
                  For additional information you might want to look at Kayak Racks and Loading
                  at http://www.cpakayaker.com/resources/kayaking-101/ . While written for
                  sea kayaks, there is a lot of useful general information.
                  Rich Stevens
                  Treasurer
                  Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
                  <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I have a similar canoe and have used both 12 and 15 ft straps. Either will
                  work but the 15 is more versatile. Sometimes I haul two kayaks on a flat
                  bar roof rack and can tie down both yaks with a 15 ft strap. The 15 on a
                  single canoe leaves a long enough loose end that you can tuck the end
                  through the car door, pull tight, and slam the door closed so that there
                  are no flapping strap ends and you head to the water.

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I get them 2' longer than the circumference of what I am securing

                  Answered on 7/8/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use 12' straps for canoes in that size.
                  Beau Larkin - mobile

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by Beau from Western Montana
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use a 15 foot to tie down a sot 11' x 24" kayak or two of the same kayaks, going through scupper holes and around the roof supports. I use a 2nd strap on the rear of the kayak if I'm traveling on the road rather than up and back to the beach. You may need a 20 without the advantage of scupper holes to pass through. I have many of these straps and use them for multiple purposes, they last for years. A squirt of WD40 on the hinge every couple months doesn't hurt.

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  It depends on the rack or carrier bar's attachment system. As far as going around a canoe or raft longer is better for me. The extra length allowed me to stand on the ground firmly and pull harder to remove slack. The extra strap length can be tied to the roof rack for travel.
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12 feet should suffice

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Well, That’s one wide canoe. I would think this is the length, but if not what I would do
                  is take a piece of rope and tie down the canoe as you would. Then measure the rope and maybe add
                  a foot or two, and that will be the NRS strap length needed.
                  Make sure always have a bowline on the front of the canoe tied to the front of your vehicle somewhere.

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use 9' length for my 16' Mad River Canoe, should give you ample length. cut a string 9' and wrap it with Canoe and what your going to tie it too. Good luck.

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by Islander from Eastern Shore of Virginia
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Depends on what you are lashing to. 9 FT would be a safe bet.

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  All depends on the type of roof rack system you have. I personally have multiple lengths, but find that the 20' straps are a quick go to in any situation as you can make them as short as you need and cleanly fold the remaining strap.

                  Answered on 7/7/2015 by Stinkyp from Atlanta, GA
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                What is the best size NRS Tie-Down Straps to handle an 11 foot SUP (Stand Up Paddleboard)?
                Asked on 6/25/2015 by SUP Man from Chicago, IL

                14 answers

                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Measure the circumference of your board and add 2ft, when in doubt round up.

                  Answered on 6/29/2015 by John from Boston,Ma
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  It depends on the width and thickness not the length of the board, however
                  I find the 9' strap allows a "double loop" method to secure even a 30"
                  wide, 6" thick board, with a little extra left over. Hope this helps...

                  Answered on 6/26/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Length not really the issue, but how wide and deep the board is, and where your yakima/thule bars are in relation to the board. Take a length of rope or string and loop around your rig allowing 6" tail or so, and measure with tape, and see what you get. I have NRS straps in many different lengths, but 12', 6', and 2' are my most used.

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Boomer from Birmingham AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Well, it depends on what type of rack the vehicle had, but a 9' standard would easily handle the job or an 8' of the color coded.

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Assuming you will be using the method of looping the strap around the
                  crossbar on the far side of the SUP, and then bringing both ends across the
                  top of the SUP and cinching it down around the crossbar on the near side,
                  use twice the width of the SUP and add about two feet. Take this measurement
                  and use the size strap that is this length or longer. You may need to add a
                  bit if you are using a padded cover or thick padding on the bars. Bear in
                  mind that you can always cut the straps shorter, but you can't easily make
                  them longer. Also consider if you may use the straps for any other purpose
                  which may require a longer strap.
                  Rich Stevens
                  Treasurer
                  Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
                  <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I'd get 12', better 3' too long than 2" too short.

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Matt Kehoe from Boston, Ma
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  This will depend on your vehicle and rack, but in general a 12 foot should be long enough.

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  9 footers work perfect on kayaks. Should do fine on your sup
                  Michael Stewart
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  That kind of depends on how wide it is and how you want to rig it. If it is 4 foot across and you plan to rig it flat on rack crossbars, then you'll probably need at least 9 foot straps. Not sure if that helps or not :)
                  Kate
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use the 15 foot to tie down two sot kayaks, which are 11'L 24"W & 11"Deep, over and back across my roof and tied into the rack. When I carry one kayak I use a 9' and have about 4' left after tightening.
                  These straps are great, just put some WD40 on the hang every couple months, especially if you are using it with salt water.

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  If strapping to roof rack
                  Width ×2 +1ft
                  -Glen Chandler

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Jaloppeno from LaGrande OR.
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Whatever size will let you go up over the top twice buy long you can always
                  cut it down

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12 footers can handle a canoe so that would certainly be enough but if you
                  have the board and the rack already just set it up as you would and run
                  string/rope around the route you would use to tie down and then measure
                  what you need.

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Dan from Worcester Mass.
                • CUSTOMER CARE

                  A:

                  I've used the 12' or 15' straps to secure an NRS SUP board (32" wide) to my roof rack. I used the tie-down technique demonstrated here: http://www.nrs.com/kayaks/tiedown.asp

                  Answered on 6/25/2015 by Kyle from NRS
              • NRS 1" HD Tie-Down Straps

                Q:

                What size for typing down just one canoe on top of a car using a Thule rack? The 9, 12, or 15 foot nrs strap?
                Asked on 5/3/2015 by Chris from Richmond, VA

                22 answers

                • Staff Reviewer

                  A:

                  Chris, this article describes how to strap a boat - http://www.nrs.com/kayaks/tiedown.asp - you can measure that length for your particular boat and choose the length.

                  Answered on 5/4/2015 by Clyde from NRS
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Sorry I can't be more helpful, but I would take a rope/string/malleable easuring tape and measure it out first.
                  Scott
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Chris,
                  I hauled a canoe on a roof rack for many years. I would buy two 15' straps
                  and loop them over and back. Any extra you can wrap around the bar. Don't
                  forget to tie the bow down to your front bumper with a rope. I also have a
                  about 50 of the NRS straps. I love those things. They are very well made
                  and last forever.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Use the length that leaves the least amount extra without too much. Take a
                  string and wrap it around whatever and measure.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use 12 feet and have some left over. Better too long than too short.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use 15's for both one or two sot kayaks, there is considerable excess with one, but the 15 is more universal.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by mjj from fort lauderdale, fl
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Depends on how big your canoe is….9 probably enough but to be on safe side, I would go w/ a 12…you can always trip the strap or ties knots to shorten it if needed.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by willkayak from Birmingham, AL
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12'
                  On the road again!

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I use the 15s. But you might get by with a 12 for a single canoe. Tuck
                  loose ends into a door. ..pull tight and slam the door. ..no flapping ends.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  What I would is take a piece of string or rope and mimic the way you would tie down the canoe and see how much is needed that way, and then maybe add a foot to that measurement.
                  Oh , and don’t for get to use a bow line also to tie to the front bumper, this is mandatory.

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  15 foot

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12ft

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  I'd measure the distance from rack rail, up and over the canoe, and back. Buy that length plus a foot ( or two). It's always better to have too much strap than not enough.
                  Kate
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Start off thinking the 12 foot strap.
                  The 9 foot works great for a Wenonah Voyager, but you will need a larger one
                  for many canoes. Consider were the straps will be on the boat when on top
                  of the car.
                  Each strap will need the height of the boat 4 times, the width of the boat
                  twice, add 6 inches just for going under the Thule bars, and another foot
                  for pulling it tight and making a safety knot.
                  You can always cut the strap shorter if you like.
                  John

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Put your boat on your car and use a piece of string where you would place the strap. Then measure the string. Easiest way to get a sure fit. I prefer the strap a little longer because you just never know. Then learn how to do it daisy-chain knot with the rest of the strap so it's not flapping in the wind while you drive.
                  Jim
                  Sent from my iPhone

                  Answered on 5/3/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  12' max. You can cut them to size. I'm not entirely sure

                  Answered on 5/4/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  If you get a 15' , you can tie of excess or cut to length and burn edge. Also, recommend bow/stern ties.
                  Good luck
                  Sent from my Windows Phone

                  Answered on 5/4/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Id go with a 15' one, then you could double it, adding extra stability and security to your canoe. Also, don't forget to put one twist in the strap (prevents that annoying numming noise--old truck driver trick). It also saves wear and tear on your straps. If you have extra, then you could cut it with a sharp knife then burn the end with a cigg lighter to keep it from fraying.
                  Enjoy!
                  Dave
                  Please note: message attached

                  Answered on 5/4/2015 by Big Dave from Burley, ID
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Really depends on the size of the canoe. I strap everything by looping so
                  actually each strap foes over the canoe twice (4 when using 2 straps). I
                  typically get by with a 12'.

                  Answered on 5/4/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  A 9 foot strap should be enough, but there isn't that much difference in
                  cost for the longer straps, and you can always cut the strap to shorten it.
                  Just use a match or grill lighter to seal the cut end to keep it from
                  fraying. Keeping a longer strap intact, while having to deal with the free
                  end, will allow more options in the future.
                  Rich Stevens
                  Treasurer
                  Chesapeake Paddlers Association, Inc.
                  <http://www.cpakayaker.com/> http://www.cpakayaker.com

                  Answered on 5/4/2015 by Capt. Rich from Arlington, VA
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Chris,
                  I think the 12 footer should do. Loop the strap around one side of your rack cross bar. Join the strap on the other side and tighten. In other words the strap runs twice over the boat. You may have a little excess strap after tightening to tie off to secure it from flapping as you drive. To be extra sure you have enough strap go for the 15 footer. Many good paddle days to you.
                  Carl
                  Sent from my iPad

                  Answered on 5/5/2015 by Anonymous
                • VERIFIED BUYER

                  A:

                  Easy to check. Just put the boat up there and run string or rope over the
                  same way you would straps, measure the string and add two feet just to be
                  sure.
                  BTW, I learned the hard way that cutting a length-labeled NRS strap is
                  considered very bad form!

                  Answered on 5/6/2015 by Dan from Worcester Mass.
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