NRS Foam Paddle Float

Item: 50007.01 | Product Description »

$29.95

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A paddle float is an essential piece of safety gear. The NRS Foam Paddle Float secures easily to your paddle blade by sliding the blade into the nylon fabric pocket on the back. A webbing buckle on the front secures the paddle to the float. Your paddle acts as an outrigger support when the other blade is secured to your boat.
  • Bright orange 400-denier nylon outer shell and strips of reflective tape provide a high level of visibility in low-light conditions.
  • EPE foam won't hold water and will stand up to years of abuse.
  • Measures 18" long by 8.5" wide by 3" thick.

Product Reviews

  (21)

More Information

Related Videos

  • video: NRS Foam Paddle Float
    NRS Foam Paddle Float
    Length:0:52
  • 18" L x 8.5" W x 3" D
  • EPE closed cell foam
  • 400-denier nylon outer shell
  • Reflective tape
  • Nylon fabric pocket for paddle blade

video: NRS Foam Paddle Float

NRS Foam Paddle Float (0:52)

A paddle float is an essential piece of safety gear. The NRS Foam Paddle Float secures easily to your paddle blade by sliding the blade into the nylon fabric pocket on the back. A webbing buckle on the front secures the paddle to the float. Your paddle acts as an outrigger support when the other blade is secured to your boat.

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2 Questions | 15 Answers
Displaying questions 1-2
  • NRS Foam Paddle Float

    Q:

    At 65 years of age, I'm looking for some assistance with getting into and out of my touring kayak. No problem with my recreational model, but the touring model is tricky for a guy with limited leg flexibility. Will a paddle float help?
    Asked on 7/8/2013 by kozmo from Finger Lakes region of New York

    10 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Kosmo,
      The foam paddle float pictured is a good device for self re-entry into your touring boat. I have one. I like it. That said, I am 57 years old and I must say that flexibility is an important characteristic when attempting a paddle float self rescue. Practice with the float and you will perhaps arrive at a comfortable level of skill with it to meet your needs. As I always do, I plan all my paddle trips to the best degree possible to minimize the risk of capsize. Enjoy!

      Answered on 7/13/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I hear you, brother. These days as I paddle into the shallow water I pull
      one leg at a time out of the boat, let em dangle over each side and then
      just stand up. Not pretty, but manageable. The float might help a little if
      you sort of dump yourself out the side. My other boat is a surf ski which
      is open like a recreational boat. It's also light and fast. And easy to get
      in and out of. Best Luck. tl

      Answered on 7/9/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Here are my thoughts although I'm not confident I understand the entire situation. I'll assume for this that Kozmo is referring to getting into and out of the kayak at the shore as opposed to being in a recovery situation in deep water. The paddle float is normally used as an assist in getting back into one's kayak after a capsize in deep water.
      My short answer would be that I don't see the paddle float being of assistance in entering or exiting a touring kayak. Rather I would encourage kozmo to explore entering with the kayak right at the water's edge, parallel with the water's edge. Assuming the shingle where the watter bottom transitions to shore is not too steep, it should be possible to step into the cockpit, then sit on the rear edge of the cockpit to maneuver the legs into position, finally slipping the butt down into the seat. Often additional bracing can be accomplished by placing the paddle across the kayak at the rear of the cockpit so that one end is extended toward the land-side and can be leaned upon to obtain stability.
      There is also an entry where the boat is placed perpendicular to the water's edge on dry land. The paddler then steps into the boat and sits with the legs placed appropriately. Then shoulders and arms are used to raise the entire boat and paddler. A series of short pushes are used to gradually ease the boat into the water. This requires pretty good strength in the arms and shoulders but affords entry on dry land. Exiting would involve paddling as far as possible onto the shore before exiting. This technique will not work well if the hull has a pronounced V shape, flatter bottoms are much easier to use in this approach.
      Feel free to edit as needed. Good luck to kozmo.
      Doug

      Answered on 7/9/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes, this paddle float serves as a reliable outrigger, though getting into
      your kayak is still a bit tricky especially at out age (62), and requires
      some practice. If deck space is an issue you're better off going with the
      inflatable model, which provides more flotation but can be carried under
      the deck.

      Answered on 7/9/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I've never used a paddle float to enter and exit a kayak at the launch point, but it should help stabilize the boat in some situations.  Paddle floats are primarily used for self rescue when no-one is around to help and pretty much all experts encourage paddlers to carry one in their boat at all times.  I have used both this model and the inflatable kind and I found both to work well.  The benefit of this foam model is that you don't have to inflate it while immersed in cold water and it is easy to remove after you are back in the boat.  The negative side is that it takes up a lot of space in/on your boat and can get in the way when doing an assisted rescue.  At this point, I use this foam model when practicing self rescues and bracing/eskimo rolls.  When I venture out I exclusively use an inflatable float to save space.

      Answered on 7/9/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      In the event of a capsize, a paddle float attaches to one end of your paddle and makes it bouyant, so you can use it as a stable aid to getting back into your kayak. The advantage of this foam paddle float is that you don't have to inflate it. You just fit one end of your paddle into it and snap the strap to secure it. If you capsize in difficult seas, this make re-entry easier.
      As far as I know, that is the use of a paddle float. I don't know how it would help in entering a kayak from the shore.

      Answered on 7/8/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Maybe
      If you are talking about re-entering you kayak after a wet exit I would say definitely.
      If you are trying to provide more stability to your kayak while entering it from a dock or shore I would also say yes.
      If you are having trouble entering your cockpit because the hole is too small I'm not sure if it will help.
      I hope my answer was helpful.
      Bill Morgan
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 7/8/2013 by Billy Bob from Knoxville, TN
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It could by using it as outrigger or just to protect your paddle blade, if
      using it on shore. My wife uses her's in a unique way. She leaves the
      skirt off in the back and inserts the float vertically behind her seat as
      backrest. It works great. The foam costs less than the inflatable ones
      and I prefer them over inflatable floats.
      Stephen

      Answered on 7/8/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      This is a good paddle float.
      An alternative is the inflatable one. Blowing it up adds another delay, exertion and level of complexity.
      I had one for about two years when I noticed a hole in one of the bags. I've had this one for 6 years.
      I'm sure you know you need to have two reliable (practiced) methods of self-rescue. This is a good one.
      Look for videos of paddle float assisted rescue to see techniques, and then with other kayakers practice them. (I'm feeling guilty here, so
      I guess tomorrow I'm going to have to practice).
      Ideally install some method of holding the other end of your paddle on the deck while you do an assisted self-rescue.
      Maybe double bungees to hold down the paddle blade or handle. A friend in Mexico (can't think of his name) uses bungees on the bottom of his cockpit. He's a friend of CKF California Kayak Friends, you might do a search.
      There are incredible forces in a paddle float rescue. I once tried bootlegging a float out of floats and rope. I've got a lot of
      experience figuring things out, but I was surprised at how completely useless my bootleg was.
      A kayaker friend Len Goodman died because he didn't have good self rescues. (See the incident report in Sea Kayaker Magazine
      about four years ago.
      Good luck, be safe

      Answered on 7/8/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The paddle float reentry is a classic self rescue technique. With your leg flexibility issue, it's hard for us to say for sure that it will work for you but it's worth a try.

      Answered on 7/8/2013 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Foam Paddle Float

    Q:

    Hi,
    Saw a negative review from a 215 lb. paddler. I'm 6'4", 245 lbs., paddling a Pygmy Coho. Should I be concerned about using this float? Much prefer a faster re-entry vs. inflation time that foam provides.
    Thanks
    Jim
    Asked on 9/21/2012 by Jim

    5 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You've got 100 lbs on me, bro. But the float need only stabilize the paddle
      for a few moments while you hoist yourself back into the boat. So it should
      still work for you. I like the one you're looking at but... The inflatable
      ones are fine, too, if you keep them inflated so you're not trying to blow
      the thing up while getting knocked around by waves.

      Answered on 9/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Jim,
      The foam float is a quality piece of gear. I'm 200 pounds, 5' 8" and it works good for me. Paddle float re-entries to me are never optimum. Especially when sea conditions are moderate to rough. I primarily paddle in protected waters where this foam float works well if needed. I rarely paddle alone so depend on an assisted re-entry with my paddling partner. Other than in protected waters, near shore, because of your height and weight , I would exercise conservative judgment if you are thinking about depending on a paddle float as your primary re-entry method. Joyful paddling!
      Carl

      Answered on 9/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hello Jim,
      I believe that practice and proper form will make this float useful. I also prefer foam to wasting time inflating something else. Good luck to you.
      Enjoy paddling, Natalie.
      NAPS 2 B Fit...Customized Health + Fitness Programs
      Specialties: Youth, Older Adult, Weight Management, Punk Rope
      Natalie Ann Pasicznyk Smith, ACE Certified Personal Trainer
      ***.****or ****@***.***
      www.ideafit.com/profile/natalie-smith

      Answered on 9/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Paddle floats are unnecessary once you develop your reentry skills.
      How much flotation you need to learn just depends on the paddler and his initial abilities.
      Reentry skills are unnecessary once you develop you rolling skills (though you will be able to reenter with just a paddle brace under you once you develop rolling skills). And in serious rough water, staying upright in a kayak half full of water after a wet exit is very iffy.
      Trying to bail out before reentry is iffy.
      Trying the various two boat rescues is very iffy in seriously rough water.
      Only a good roll can keep you safe.
      G

      Answered on 9/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Here's my two cents' worth: I use the rigid foam paddle float mainly for practicing recoveries and it gives lots of flotation and its flatness helps scull over the water for stability while practicing extreme lean angles and just goofing around (layouts on the water for fun or doing deepest dips to either side for body-boat-paddle orientation drills). I would normally not take the rigid float out on my boat only because it is a little awkward to stow, but your point about losing time inflating a float is a good one--I paddle around Tomales Bay and offshore in the Pacific and the water is usually 50-55 degrees so the less time spent immersed the better.
      The thing is (at any time but especially in cold water) it's just so much better to stay in the boat. Learn to roll--it's so much easier than exiting and securing gear and inflating or rigging a float, managing your recovery, bailing your cockpit and resecuring your sprayskirt, especially since the conditions that forced your exit still exist while you are attempting all that and it's likely to be risky. Stay in the boat for warmth and flotation--a roll should be the first thing you do and if you practice some it will be an immediate and natural reaction to the capsize and becomes fun then, not a "rescue" but only a "recovery" that builds confidence and is a good basic boat handling technique. Another note about paddle float recoveries in general, especially for us bigger guys, is that they can put tremendous strain on the paddle and they can break, so if you are going to count on a paddle float recovery as your primary capsize solution be sure to always carry a spare paddle. I speak from experience and never go out without a stout spare paddle and have used it once upon breaking my lightweight very expensive primary paddle while finishing a wet exit and paddle recovery in brisk wind and choppy waves when the blade under the deck rigging snapped when the boat rolled over me in the waves. Without that spare paddle my situation would have been pretty precarious. Sometimes a wet re-entry and paddle roll (with or without a float) works when conditions are poor but a boat full of water will capsize again very easily so I would really only suggest that if there is another boat to raft up with while you bail and get your act together.
      I'm a bigger guy, too, and my boat is a 17'10" Impex Assateague, often loaded for camping but more often riding high and empty except for lunch and my beach gear. Since I often paddle alone I also have on deck a nifty device called a BackUp, which is an ingenious CO2 inflatable for positive capsize recoveries in the event of very bad conditions or injury (shoulders are susceptible)--you can find it online http://www.useakayak.org/recoveries_rescues/roll_aid_recovery.html . This thing is foolproof and enables you to roll up under any conditions--not a substitute for learning to roll but a very sensible Plan B or C.
      OK, one last comment about learning to roll--after you stroke away from the dock or beach, if you knock off a roll or two you get intimate with your boat immediately and are more ready to paddle with a locked in boat-body-blade muscle memory kind of thing going on.
      Hope this ramble helped a little--paddle safe.
      Ol' Salty Bob

      Answered on 9/22/2012 by Anonymous
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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS Foam Paddle Float
 
4.1

(based on 21 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (9)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (9)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

89%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Easy to attach (9)
  • Rugged (6)
  • Easy to use (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Day trip (10)
    • Touring (10)
    • Casual/ recreational (5)
    • Kayak / canoe / rafting (3)
    • Kayak camping (3)
      • Was this a gift?:
      • No (21)

    Most Liked Positive Review

     

    A serious float!

    I use this float as a permanent accessory for my kayak. It lives on the blade of my spare paddle, lashed to the deck and ready to go. This is a must for my...Read complete review

    I use this float as a permanent accessory for my kayak. It lives on the blade of my spare paddle, lashed to the deck and ready to go. This is a must for my solo trips. I selected this product because in frigid water, with waves crashing on me and wind trying to steal my boat and gear, the last thing I want to do is fuss with getting a baggie on my paddle, inflating it, and praying it doesn't leak. This float is a "no fail" system. Life saving equipment should not require small muscle movement or numerous steps. This float makes self rescue a breeze. A first time kayaker, even one oversized for their boat, will get back in the cockpit as if they were falling off a log. This was the best "always ready" paddle float I found and I endorse it fully. - 34 y/o male, east coast USA, paddling since 1998.

    VS

    Most Liked Negative Review

     

    Only used in a demonstration

    I have only used it in a demonstration however it worked great. I enjoyed its immediate use - others require you to fill them up. My paddle fit great and I was able to ...Read complete review

    I have only used it in a demonstration however it worked great. I enjoyed its immediate use - others require you to fill them up. My paddle fit great and I was able to climb back into my Kayak. It is also a great seat cushion for on shore breaks.

    Reviewed by 21 customers

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    5.0

    A Dry Start

    By kozmo

    from Finger Lakes of New York

    About Me Casual/ Recreational

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Easy To Use
    • Reliable
    • Waterproof

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Touring Kayak

      Comments about NRS Foam Paddle Float:

      At 65 years of age, my hips and legs are not as flexible as they were 40 years ago, but I still love the water and kayaking. Until I bought the Foam Paddle Float, I was having difficulty entering and exiting my touring kayak. About 50% of the time, I rolled the boat over at the start or finish. No problem with my old recreational boat, but the newer, sleeker touring kayak became a wet ride.
      Now, using the Float as an outrigger, I'm dry all day.

      Thanks - great product and very well made.
      kozmo

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No
       
      4.0

      "Multi-tasking paddle float"

      By Dancing Waters

      from St. Paul, Minnesota

      About Me Advanced

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Doubles As A "beach Seat"
      • Easy To Use
      • Very User-friendly
      • Waterproof

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Canoeing
        • Kayaking
        • Personal Watercraft

        Comments about NRS Foam Paddle Float:

        Quick and easy to attach paddle in a capsize situation; really stabilizes paddle for a successful
        re-entry; doubles as a "beach seat" and a back rest;
        when attached to kayak deck bungees, acts as a great
        wave deflector from the bow

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No
         
        5.0

        It Floats

        By Dan

        from Blue Grass Iowa

        About Me Casual/ Recreational

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Easy To Attach
        • Rugged

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Day Trips
          • Recreational Paddlers
          • Touring

          Comments about NRS Foam Paddle Float:

          The first time I needed to use a float paddle I had an inflatable one. It leaked. So I bought the foam one, just felt I could trust it more. It is bulky, but does fit in the bungees behind the seat.

          • Was this a gift?:
          • No
           
          2.0

          Cannot support heavier paddlers

          By John

          from Wisconsin

          Pros

          • Easy To Attach

          Cons

          • Not Functional

          Best Uses

            Comments about NRS Foam Paddle Float:

            This float will not support my 215 lb. body. I thought I was using it incorrectly but an instructor later told me I needed an inflatable float instead. (I wish the salesperson had told me that.) The float worked fine for the 150 lb. instructor in a calm pond. Between 150 and 215 lbs., I don't know.

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No

            (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

             
            1.0

            Wasn't able to successfully use it

            By PaddlingForFun

            from Oregon

            Verified Reviewer

            Pros

              Cons

              • Not Functional

              Best Uses

              • Touring

              Comments about NRS Foam Paddle Float:

              I was learning rescues in the pool, and was not able to self rescue using this float. I like the concept of not having to blow up a float once I land in the water. However, it didn't serve it's purpose for me. According to my certified kayak instructor, the design of this float isn't good, because it's difficult to strap to the paddle blade, and it sits too low in the water. If I could trade it in for something else, I would.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

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