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Item: 47300.01 | Product Description »

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Both rescue professionals and recreational boaters will really love the features of the NRS Pilot Knife. Not only does its unique design attract attention, the sheath provides convenient access and release of the knife when you need it most.
  • An excellent knife for freshwater boating and rescue. For saltwater use, choose the NRS Titanium Pilot Knife.
  • The cutting edge has both smooth and serrated sections plus a rope cutting hook.
  • The blunt tip design protects against unintentional puncture of your gear or yourself! Also doubles as a flat-head screwdriver.
  • The unique sheath firmly locks the knife in place and only lets it go when you squeeze both sides of the release.
  • The contoured handle and rubberized grip gives you maximum control of the blade.
  • The sheath clip attaches firmly to a PFD lash tab.
  • The handle has a built in glass breaking tip on the end.
  • Also included is a bottle opener in the handle of the knife.

Product Reviews

  (99)

Related Videos

  • video: NRS Pilot and Co-Pilot Knife Video
    NRS Pilot and Co-Pilot Knife Video
    Length:4:09
Blade Material: 420 HC Stainless Steel
Handle Material: Glass-reinforced polypropylene with TPR over mold
Sheath Material: Fiberglass-reinforced nylon
Total Length: 7.38"
Blade Length: 3"
Weight: 5.5 oz
Knife only Weight: 3.5 oz
Blade Edge: Smooth and serrated
Blade Tip: Blunt
Features:
  • Matte finish on orange handle model
  • PVD coating on black handle model
  • Rope cutting hook
  • Glass-breaking point at handle end
  • Square hole in handle doubles as a valve wrench for an Oxygen tank
  • Bottle opener hole in handle

video: NRS Pilot and Co-Pilot Knife Video

NRS Pilot and Co-Pilot Knife Video (4:09)

Both rescue professionals and recreational boaters will really love the features of the NRS Pilot and Co-Pilot Knife. Not only does their unique design attract attention, their sheath provides convenient access and release of the knife when you need it most.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS Pilot Knife
 
4.0

(based on 99 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (47)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (29)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (8)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (9)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (6)

82%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Comfortable grip (70)
  • Easy to use (70)
  • Sharp blade (60)
  • Versatile (60)
  • Good weight (58)

Cons

  • Poor craftsmanship (6)

Best Uses

  • Kayak / canoe / rafting (77)
  • Day trip (36)
  • Survival (35)
  • Backcountry camping (28)
  • Camping (23)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Casual/ recreational (7), Avid adventurer (6), Military/law enforcement (3)
    • Was this a gift?:
    • No (86), Yes (11)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

Great Knife

This is great knife to have on the river. First trip out with the knife I had to use it to cut down an old swing rope to help unpin a kayak under a...Read complete review

This is great knife to have on the river. First trip out with the knife I had to use it to cut down an old swing rope to help unpin a kayak under a rock. Having a knife on your vest every time you are on the river is extremely helpful. The holder keeps the knife tight and never budges. I would completely recommend this knife.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

Awesome knife needs defect fixed

I work as a Paramedic in WA State. I recently purchased this knife for my swiftwater rescue gear and am very happy with it but must now send it back due to the soft...Read complete review

I work as a Paramedic in WA State. I recently purchased this knife for my swiftwater rescue gear and am very happy with it but must now send it back due to the soft rubber on the handle peeling away from the blade. I am not one to complain but I purchased this knife last month. I would recommend using a harder rubber material on the handle. If this defect can be fixed, all the other features the Pilot has to offer makes this is an awesome knife.

Reviewed by 99 customers

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

if I have to i will buy it again.

By Gustavo

from Laredo Tx

About Me Military/Law Enforcement

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Comfortable Grip
  • Compact
  • Durable
  • Easy To Use
  • Good Weight
  • Sharp Blade
  • Versatile

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Rescue
    • Survival

    Comments about NRS Pilot Knife:

    It's part of my rescue gear.

    Service and delivery comments:

    Great service overall.

    • Was this a gift?:
    • No
     
    5.0

    Great Knife

    By Cheif Loan Pine

    from Pendleton, OR

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Comfortable Grip
    • Durable
    • Easy To Use
    • Good Weight
    • Sharp Blade
    • Versatile

    Cons

    • Lenght Is A Bit Long

    Best Uses

    • Backcountry Camping
    • Campgrounds
    • Day Trips
    • River Trips
    • Road Trips
    • Survival

    Comments about NRS Pilot Knife:

    This knife was designed for the rafter who wants to make sure they are ready with the correct equipment for rescue: rescue a tangled swimmer, a caught rope or a bottle of beer with a stuck cap.

    • Was this a gift?:
    • No
     
    5.0

    SURVIVOR

    By Marshmallo

    from Gorham, Me.

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Stays Put

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Whitewater

      Comments about NRS Pilot Knife:

      This knife has stayed put during training i.e. over 40 trips down a class 4 rapid over a 10 day training period. As many times as I am in and out of the raft, the knife remains affixed to me, in its sheath, and ready to go. And it does not mind the water, no matter how cold. Great knife.

      • Was this a gift?:
      • Yes
       
      4.0

      Good tool not a knife

      By None of your busness. Stop asking

      from Stop asking

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Comfortable Grip
      • Compact
      • Durable
      • Easy To Use
      • Good Weight
      • Sharp Blade
      • Versatile

      Cons

      • Can Rust

      Best Uses

      • Backcountry Camping
      • Campgrounds
      • Day Trips
      • River Trips
      • Road Trips
      • Survival

      Comments about NRS Pilot Knife:

      Daily use

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No
       
      4.0

      Years of commercial use - needs modded

      By Dustin

      from Banks, ID

      Verified Reviewer

      Pros

      • Good Weight
      • Quickly Accesible
      • Versatile

      Cons

      • Handle Stickout - Snags
      • Old Model Falls Out

      Best Uses

      • Backcountry Camping
      • River Trips

      Comments about NRS Pilot Knife:

      I've had my pilot knife for at least 4 years I think. Long enough that it still has the plastic clasps. Everybody that I know has lost that knife because of that. The new model with metal clasps holds better, but leaves something to be desired. Most knives stick out a lot and putting them on that stupid square lash tabe allows them to catch on the chicken line when climbig back in. This knife rides really well when zip tied to a shoulder strap. To keep it from snagging on anything, I sewed on end of a small lenght of velcro to my jacket, looped that through the handle, and attached it to the other half of the velcro that I'd sewn to the jacket as well. The result is the window smashing end of the handle being snug to the jacket at all times, but the velcro coming loose when the knife is released from the sheath and pulled straight forward. This is a mod that should be done to just about any fixed-blade, sheathed knife, but it has kept my knife from popping out in many many years of flips, swims, bridge/cliff jumps, and pirate ship boarding attacks.

      Hope that helps.

      p.s. I also put a rubber band in the gap between the release buttons and the sheath, wrapped around the back. Which made the release much stiffer/positive.

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No

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      Do you have questions about this product?

      Get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

      12 Questions | 98 Answers
      Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Sorry, but I was not too precise. Is this knife (or Co Pilot) also suitable for sailors (not kayakers) when need to cut off the harness leash from something solid during a storm, or cut off the life raft?
        Asked on 7/13/2015 by Kik from Belfast, UK

        6 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I'm a canoeist, not a sailor. The main use we have for the rescue knife
          would be the same as yours, cutting rope or webbing. The NRS knife in
          question has a partially serrated edge. Personally, I prefer a razor
          sharp,conventionally bladed knife for the aforementioned purposes. Some
          boaters can't sharpen knives, in which a quality serrated edge would be
          much better than nothing.
          The knife in question is a quality piece of equipment. I got it for my girl
          friend. I like the release mechanism, which is easy to use and seems
          significantly more secure than the analogous arrangement on my similar
          Gerber knife.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by Slow Joe from Staunton, VA
        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          Kik, the knives are pretty darn sharp and you can always touch it up if you like it sharper. Let me note that although they're stainless steel, using them in a saltwater environment you'll want to rinse the knife in fresh water after each excursion, and applying a light oil occasionally is a good idea.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by Clyde from NRS
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Yes, but I advise someone that is good with a whetstone further sharpen the
          blades of any new knives you purchase. I was not satisfied with its edge
          out of the box.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by DavisD from New York
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I would certainly think this knife would work with sailing cordage although
          some of the heavy duty cordage might be more difficult to cut through.
          Dave

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by mac from Bozeman, MT
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I'm a swift water rescue instructor and use this in class. Its a great unit and stays in its holder. It will cut what ever you need, rope, webbing, harness. Great life safety unit.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It's a great knife for things like that. I just keep it in a place where I'm not worried about it snagging in anything. I've had it act as a snag point when things get caught on it.
          Brian Green

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by Anonymous
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Did you recommend this knife as rescue life for ocean sailors?
        Asked on 7/12/2015 by Kik from Belfast, UK

        9 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Yes. It is a fantastic product.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          The knife may not be large enough for the larger ropes that I assume (not having any experience as an ocean sailor) would be in use on ocean going sailing vessels. Also, I suspect the blunt tip is not likely to be as important on an ocean going sailing vessel as it can be when dealing with kayaks, canoes and inflatables. It is a great knife for my purposes.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by jaeger from pittsburgh
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Yes, its small, I have it clipped to the front of my PFD.

          Answered on 7/13/2015 by phatguppy from Petaluma, CA
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Don't see why not if you wear a pfd.
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 7/12/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Fairly basic water knife, probably not rescue grade. Be careful as to
          placement on vest, lots of exposed, hard, pointy edges.

          Answered on 7/12/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Good general knife. I stickle “rescue" knife would need a hook blade. They are better to cut line at night. I have it on my skirt for ocean kayaking.

          Answered on 7/12/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It’s a great rescue knife for river…mounts easily on a vest, durable, stays in it’s mount until needed, good edge without having a point so sharp it can accidentally damage. Yes, I’d recommend it as a rescue knife for ocean sailors.

          Answered on 7/12/2015 by Ken the Roller from West Richland
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No sir I did not. I used it for having a knife at the ready while on a
          canoe in the boundary waters. I can't say that it would be a good knife for
          what you are wanting without doing what you are asking. It is a good solid
          knife that is quickly accessed. It isn't that expensive if you don't buy
          the Ti version so give it a shot.

          Answered on 7/12/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It is an excellent knife - strong one piece blade & handle, holds an edge well and resharpens without too much effort, has shoes no signs of rust from either fresh or salt water. The sheath holds securely,  releases when you want it, and attaches securely. I wear it inverted on a PFD so thats it easily reached by either hand yet out of the way when I am canoeing or kayaking.
          It cut all thicknesses of rope cleanly and easily as well as bait. The blunt point is nice. In short, I agree with everything NRS says in their advertisement.
          However, if NRS offered an accessory grip that could attach over the existing handle that allowed it to FLOAT, it would be a perfect all boating knife. I swift water, I like it's flatness because it doesn't interfere with my movements. In deep water, I like a knife that floats because it won't do me much good 60' down.
          ps - I do not have the titanium model. If it's lighter in weight, it might be the perfect knife with a floating handle.

          Answered on 7/12/2015 by WC from Virginia
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Just bought this knife. The springs are obviously very tight. To replace it, I have to squeeze the sides with one hand and press it back into the sheath with the other. Is this knife designed to be replaced into the sheath with one hand? It seams like it could (or should) be done just by pressing into the sheath. When I try I have to press so hard it actually shaves metal.
        Asked on 5/31/2015 by DKS from San Antonio

        9 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I have an older one where the clips that hold it in are plastic. This one looks like it has metal clips. My plastic one is fairly easy to insert the knife, no plastic being shaved off as it is pressed into the sheath. If yours is shaving metal off the clips I would suspect that there is something wrong with the spring mechanism. I would inspect for a small pebble or some other debris. If you don't find anything obvious, talk to NRS, they are usually good about returns/exchanges.
          Sent from Windows Mail

          Answered on 6/11/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Mine is easy to handle one handed. Either you will get used to yours with a little more practice or it is slightly defective. NRS is a great outfit. If you’re having trouble, call customer service and ask their advice. Adventure ON!

          Answered on 6/2/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I've had no issue returning the knife to the holder.
          Just push the tip in and then press on the center just below the clip, it pops right in.
          Sent from my iPhone

          Answered on 6/1/2015 by Raybo from New England
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I have no problem "one handing" the knife back into the sheath, my springs
          never seemed to too tight. Make sure it is mounted snugly on your PFD.
          Otherwise you may try "breaking it in" by putting your PFD in your lap and
          repeatedly extracting and replacing the knife.

          Answered on 6/1/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          More important than a two-handed return is the one-handed release,
          essential in an emergency. I just now put on my life jacket and tried to
          return the knife with one hand. It's not impossible, but it is difficult to
          do. With two hands I can easily re-sheathe the knife without the "shaving
          metal" that you describe. I pinched the release springs with one hand while
          depressing the blade with the other hand, allowing the notched prongs to
          snap back into place on the outsides of the square hole. But again, a
          one-handed return seems both unnecessary and unlikely. In a real emergency
          I would be less worried about getting the knife back in place than in
          getting my life saved (or someone else's) in the first place. If I were to
          lose the knife for failure to re-sheathe it with one hand, I would count
          that as a small price to pay in exchange for a life.
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 5/31/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I have had this knife the longest of any river knife for the exact reason
          it takes some"work" to get it returned to it's sheath. It needs to be snug
          in order to keep the knife in place until it's needed. 95% of all river
          knife usage is simple tasks including peeling a orange or cleaning your
          finger nails. When it counts this knife releases with one hand. I have no
          problem taking an extra second to safely store this knife. I have never
          needed two hands to preform this task. Good luck.

          Answered on 5/31/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          You should be able to operate with normal pressure w/ one hand. I'd contact
          nrs and get a replacement

          Answered on 5/31/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I am able to snap the knife back in the sheath with one hand by putting the
          point in first then pressing the upper handle with thumb on back of sheath
          and index finger on front. I am also 65 yrs old so I don't have a lot of
          strength.

          Answered on 5/31/2015 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I have not had trouble with this. the springs are tight so it will not fall out, but it should not shave metal. You may need to return it
          Alan

          Answered on 5/31/2015 by Anonymous
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Does the knife case have screws to secure to pdf?
        Asked on 12/13/2013 by Hannah from Cincinnati, OH

        25 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No, it does not have screws. It does not need them… Pretty much all PDF's have a square or diamond shaped thing on the front of the vest for attaching things (like the knife) to. The back of the knife case has a (slide-on) clip for clipping directly onto this piece of the vest. But one thing… This clip is very difficult to remove once you have put it on the vest, so before you put it on, make sure the position you plan to use, is the correct one for you. Hope that helps. Good luck. :-)

          Answered on 12/15/2013 by Utah Dave from Logan, Utah
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          no. I just clipped it to my lash tab on my pfd in the Grand Canyon.

          Answered on 12/17/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No, just slides onto lash tab. 
          From my Android phone on T-Mobile. The first nationwide 4G network.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Actually there are no screws, only a clip that is part of the sheath. Fits pretty securely to the pre installed attachment points on my NRS Chinook PFD. It doesn't quite lay flat and sort of lops forward so I have it on the shoulder strap on my upper chest.
          Craig
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Hi Hannah,
          No it does not.
          Ham Robbins
          "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free
          state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, SHALL NOT BE
          INFRINGED"

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No. It clips into a plastic attachment point that are on all white water
          PFD’s. Some PFD’s have multiple attachment points. It’s very secure and
          the sheath is almost impossible to get out once you clip it in.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No there is a clip that attaches to your pdf
          Sent from my iPhone

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No it slides into an opening on your PFD and it is very secure.
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          The knife sheath does not have screws; it has a clip on the back that
          easily hooks on to the lash tab or could fit into a zippered pocket (if
          there is no lash tab).

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Phil from Saint Cloud, MN
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It doesn't have screws, but a clip in the back. The clip is pretty hardy. I have it strapped to my Astral PFD - It's been through some pretty gnarly whitewater and survived waves in the Atlantic ocean from beach launches in my sea kayak. Hope this helps.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It doesn't have any screws, just a big clip to the pdf tab.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It doesn't have screws but a clip on it to attach to lash tabs.
          -Richard
          Sent from my iPhone

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No it has a securement clip. You can clip it to the webbing on the buckle of your pfd if your pfd doesn't have one of those rubber attachment squares built into it. It Barley clips into my big water jacket but the knife is very nice.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No screws, the sheath is one-piece, molded ABS plastic. Most pfd's have a
          square tab that it will attach to. It stays very secure on my Ninja. I
          love mine.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Runner Mike from Kansas City, Missouri
        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          Hannah, the sheath has a clip on the back that's designed to fasten on a lash tab, that black square you see on many life jackets. Here's a video that shows how to remove a sheath from a lash tab - http://www.nrs.com/boating_tips/how_to_knife_lash_tab.asp

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Clyde from NRS
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It does not come with screws. It has a clip with a lip that wraps a strap loop on my vest. It stays very secure during very high activity level. It has never come off. By memory I think it does have appropriate void space to use a pan head screw with a button/acorn lock nut to screw to a vest.
          Aaron Adams

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          The sheath has a clip that clips to a lash tab on your PFD. There are no screws. It can also be clipped to a belt.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          The knife attaches to a PFD lash tab with a plastic clip located on the back of the knife sheath.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No, there are no screws for mounting, but there is a very durable clip on the back that clips onto the PFD at the bracket on the front. I have never had the knife come loose or come off of the PFD accidentally. Once it is placed in the bracket, it is a very solid fit. You can remove it to make adjustments if you need to but it will not accidentally come dislodged from your PFD. Notice the square patch on the left side. That is where the knife goes. It can be mounted horizontal or vertical on the vest.

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Joe from South East
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I don't recall if screws were supplied for the case.
          However, I attached mine to my PFD with nylon zip ties, cinched up tight.
          Mark

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No screws to secure to pfd. simply a place where you attach it to pfd accessory strap that wraps around the shoulder strap. Mine
          works great and is easy to unleash the blade when you need it, whether it's for a life saving slice or for spreading that cream
          cheese on your favorite bagel!!

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by kokopelli from Hood River, OR
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No it does not have screws. It uses the standard rescue pfd plastic clip.
          Sent from my iPod

          Answered on 12/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I believe you meant PFD- personal floatation device? The product description says, “The sheath attaches firmly to a PFD lash tab.”

          Answered on 12/14/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          The knife case has a clip to clip it to a plastic receptacle that most
          modern quality life jackets have.

          Answered on 12/14/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          No there is only a clip that fits on the square attachment mount on most pfds
          Sent from my iPhone

          Answered on 12/14/2013 by Anonymous
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        How do I sharpening this knife? any guide to do it?
        Asked on 8/27/2013 by Ivan from Los Angeles, CA

        1 answer

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Take it to a knife sharpener. Unless you have been hacking away at
          wood and rocks you should not need to.

          Answered on 8/28/2013 by Mountain Momma from Laramie, WY
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Which knife is better this one or the titanium version
        Asked on 8/12/2013 by Matt from Whitestone NY

        2 answers

        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          Matt, it depends on where you're using it. For freshwater use the stainless steel model is fine. If you plan on using it on salt water, the titanium model has superior corrosion resistance.

          Answered on 8/13/2013 by Clyde from NRS
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I can't compare the titanium version, but the pilot knife style is great, easy to carry and easy to get to from its case. Either material should be great!

          Answered on 8/13/2013 by Anonymous
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Just curious what purposes you see the blunt side of the blade being used for. Was thinking about sharpening it but wanted to see what the manufacturers intended purpose for it was before I did it.

        Thanks
        Chris Haun
        Asked on 8/11/2013 by Fixitagain from La Center, Washington

        14 answers

        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          Chris, the blunt tip has a purpose, that of protecting a person you are rescuing. Often if you have a person trapped in a boat or wrapped in rope or webbing and you're trying to cut them loose you want to avoid harming them with the knife you're using to cut them free.

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Clyde from NRS
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I am thinking it was a safety issue, that is if you need to get the blade in a tight place such as next to skin to say cut a tangled rope or strap away from a struggling person it would be less likely to accidently cut them. On the other hand if you are in a hurry you still have to have the blade turned the right way so there is a down side both ways.
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I have used it as a screwdriver and a wedge/lever. Given the nature of the knife and the purposes for which I purchased it, I did not want to have two sharp edges.
          Sent from my iPhone

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          As a dive/rescue blade you don't want to have points moving around your air hoses if you are entangled in weeds, straps, rope, or any other hazard you can cut free of. Especially in zero visibility environments or extreme cold environment where dexterity can be an issue. I would personally not sharpen the tip if an intended purpose of the blade is for rescue, whether self or others. Hope his helps.

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I believe it's real intent is to be a flathead screwdriver and the end of the hand is a glass breaker. I have tested the bottle opener on numerous occasions and it works great.
          Craig
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          In rafting you don't want an unintentional puncture = blunt point

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          This message was originally HTML formatted. View in a HTML capable client to see the original version.\r\n\r\n
          The blunt side of the knife is for spreading peanut butter so you dont dull the sharp edge when needed in an emergency.

          Answered on 8/11/2013 by Noreen from Bluff, UT
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Hmmm.... I've considered this myself and opted not to sharpen, thinking
          that for emergency use you use that area to get under the rope or whatever
          without cutting yourself and then use the serrated edges for cutting the
          line.
          Paul

          Answered on 8/12/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I use the blunt side of the blade to spread hummus or peanut butter on my bagel. I think it's meant to be used for utilitarian purposes and not for cutting.
          Ted Wright

          Answered on 8/12/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Chris,
          From what I understand it is supposed to be used around inflatables, rafts,
          etc. It prevents an accidental puncture of the boat. Interestingly, not
          long after purchasing it, I took a whitewater rescue class. We were taught
          that in a desperate situation you might sometimes want to puncture a raft
          as a last ditch effort to unpin someone. Hope this help.

          Answered on 8/12/2013 by Dan from Worcester Mass.
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Just for starters, I’ve used it for leverage to use on things that are jammed or frozen together. (In Alaska it happens!)

          Answered on 8/13/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I thought it was funny that the blunt side was advertised as an excellent cream cheese spreader whe I purchased it! As it turns out, that's about all it truly is good
          for!! Still like the knife.

          Answered on 8/17/2013 by kokopelli from Hood River, OR
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Spreading cream cheese on bagels.

          Answered on 8/28/2013 by Mountain Momma from Laramie, WY
        • A:

          I use it for shucking oysters

          Answered on 9/10/2013 by Vincent Gbone from San Diego, Ca
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Is there a warranty on this knife
        Asked on 6/22/2013 by Ryan

        2 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          NRS will warranty it.

          Answered on 6/22/2013 by Anonymous
        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          Ryan, the Pilot, like all our products, is backed by our Rock Solid Guarantee - http://www.nrsweb.com/guarantee.asp

          Answered on 6/22/2013 by Clyde from n
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        in the description it says that the yellow one has a Matte finish and the black one has a PVD coating. Is one finish/coating better than the other? Is one of them easier to clean than the other?
        Asked on 5/11/2013 by mitch from the open road

        7 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Don't know about the different coatings/finishes. They're probably the same. I've got the black one (think they were sold out of the yellow at the time).
          I use it in salt water, Pacific Ocean. Curious, I don't remember the titanium for salt water option mentioned when I bought it.
          Mine rusts easily, but it doesn't spread, so it's not going to disintegrate.
          It's easy to sharpen, seems to keep the edge.
          I leave it attached to my PFD, hose it off after weekly paddles, don't do any other maintenance. Sharpen it once a year or so.
          I don't maintain it as much as I should but I can count on it to do what it's supposed to do. (There's no tetanus risk from the rust)
          Ideally I would sharpen it, then coat it with wax--or I should've got the titanium one.
          The plastic parts, handle, mounting bracket are all bulletproof. I attached it to my PFD with plastic cable ties.
          The bracket works good, it is one handed which is essential. It's never once popped out by accident.
          I like the blunt screwdriver tip. In a kayak on the water a sharp point is more of a hazard than a help.
          If you need a knife to cut lines in an emergency, get the hook knife. That'll hook the line or strap and then you just pull to cut. It'll also be safer if you jumbled and tangled. Firefighters and EMTs have these for seat belts.
          I once used it to pry open a GPS to change batteries, calm day, flat seas. Little slip and cut myself. So if you need a screwdriver and a knife, get one of each, unless you're only going to pry or screw on the beach.
          Be safe, see you on the water.
          Will

          Answered on 5/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I don't think the coatings are different.  The black knife will be more difficult to find than the bright colors if you drop it in the river.

          Answered on 5/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Both finishes protect the blade from corrosion and wear. You won't have
          issues from either. The difference is cosmetics, so pick the one you like
          best. This is an easy pick cause its a win-win scenario. You won't be
          disappointed either way.

          Answered on 5/11/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I would say they are not any harder to clean than the other. The orange one
          has a nice polish to it. The black one is more of a matt. But I wouldnt say
          it effects how easy it comes clean. Great knives! I love mine.

          Answered on 5/12/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Hello
          We use only the yellow ones for our marine activities, the are quite easy to clean, very durable, and an excellent product!
          Mike Christie
          ATREC Inc.
          http://atrec-inc.com

          Answered on 5/12/2013 by Anonymous
        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          Mitch, there's no functional difference in the two coatings. They are both designed to minimize corrosion.

          Answered on 5/13/2013 by Clyde from NRS
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Not sure if one is better than the other. I purchased the black one and is seems to just be a matte finish and does not have any special coating. Good river knife I would recommend it

          Answered on 5/13/2013 by Anonymous
      • NRS Pilot Knife

        Q:

        Would this knife be a good tool for a beach life guard as I need a rescue knife?(if not any alternatives)
        Asked on 3/27/2013 by Caleb from Florida

        10 answers

        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          Yeah just get ti model won't rust on you...
          Sent from my iPhone

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          yes,it is very easy to get out and though my buddies complain about the
          blunt point,I like the saftey.I would suggest the orange color though.

          Answered on 4/1/2013 by Karen from Tignall Georgia
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It's a great knife. I have three of them and take them down the river all
          the time.
          They are always in the water and do not tarnish.

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It's great for urgent needs on whitewater...quickly cutting thru snagged
          netting on the main fork of tye salmon river idaho so our raft wouldn't
          flip...so I imagine it would fit most of your situations---unless you're
          battling a great white shark

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          YES, I keep it on my life vest in case I need to cut a rope. Quick to get
          out and use.

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          This is a great knife for moving water rescue where you may get boats hung up on sweepers, have to rig z-pulleys to free hang-ups and other line handling chores. My imagination can’t picture needing anything this hefty at the beach, however, myself, having never guarded any where but a waterfront on a lake, I think this is overkill. If this knife comes in a downsized version, I suspect it would be just perfect for the beach. Have a safe and happy waterfront career.

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          It is a great choice. I have used it as a marine patrol and lifeguard staff for a number of years.
          Sent from my iPad

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I am not familiar with all the needs of beach rescues, but it should work.. I have used it on a few river rescues. It has a rope cutting slot and one side of the knife has a sharp serrated blade. The sheath holds the knife secure. Not sure how you will fasten it to your speedo?

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • VERIFIED BUYER

          A:

          I do not know the scope of life guard duties. I use(d) the pilot for a cutting tool as a rescue diver and for sea kayaking. It is a great tool. Easy to access, control and replace even with gloves on. I did have one of the the center mount keepers break off while ice diving. Very cold that day and I think it just got brittle. I would buy this again and have as a gift for a fellow diver and paddler.

          Answered on 3/27/2013 by Anonymous
        • Staff Reviewer

          A:

          It's a great knife. The sheath is designed to fit on a life jacket lash tab or a belt. If that doesn't work for you consider a folding knife, like the Wingman, Item # 2771, that you can slip in a pocket. If your duties are on salt water you should consider the Titanium Pilot, Item # 27571, for its corrosion resistance. The non-titanium Pilot will require regular rinsing and oiling to prevent some rusting in salt water usage.

          Answered on 3/28/2013 by Clyde from NRS
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