• 877.677.4327
  • |
  • Customer Service
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts (alternate image)
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts (alternate image)

NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

Item: 86039.01 | Product Description »

$1,995.00

  (2) | Write a Review | Ask a Question | 16 Questions

Available SIZE:

Available COLOR:

How many? @

$0.00
Please complete the required steps.

Check Availability

Orders over $75 ship for free!*

10% Off All Accesrrories! Considered by many to be the best all-around size NRS raft, the 14' Outlaw 140 gives you the load capacity for multiday trips for 2-3 people, room for fishing, and stability for big water paddling. And the price is unbeatable.
  • NRS Outlaw Series Rafts give you time-tested NRS boat designs at a price that will make you smile.
  • 21" tubes and a 7' 2" width give the 14' Outlaw 140 great carrying capacity and big water stability while still being small enough for rocky technical waters.
  • Super heavy-duty tube and floor material shrug off hard boating abuse.
  • A 4" thick drop-stitch floor insert inflates to a rigid 8-10 psi, giving the boat a stiffer wave-punching ride while providing a stable platform for standing in the boat.
  • To get the rigid structure in the floor for best performance you will need a high-pressure pump.
  • With the optional third thwart 8-9 paddlers can have a blast running rivers.
  • Frame wear patches on top of the tubes and extra material on the bottoms of the side tubes protect against abrasion and wear.
  • 12 stainless steel 2" D-rings give plenty of tie-down points for frame and gear.
  • Four comfortable EasyCarry™ handles make carrying it to the water a breeze.
  • Three main-tube air chambers keep you afloat in the event of an accident.
  • Self-bailing floor with quick-draining holes lets you leave the bucket at home.
  • Trouble-free Leafield™ C7 Valves ensure easy inflation/deflation of the tubes, thwarts and floor.
  • The NRS BAT™ (Batten Attachment Thwart system) lets you easily add or remove thwarts to accommodate paddlers or a rowing frame.
  • 3-year retail warranty, 1-year commercial.
Series: Outlaw
Length: 14'
Width: 7' 2"
Weight: 145 lbs.
Tube Diameter: 21"
Number of Thwarts: 2
Bow Kick: 30"
Stern Kick: 30"
Number of Air Chambers: 6
Valve Type: Leafield - C7
Self Bailing: Yes
Type of Material: PVC
Weight/Denier of Tube Material: 48/2000
Weight/Denier of Floor Material: 68/4000
Number of D-rings: 12
Number of Handles: 4
Center Compartment Width: 44"
Suggested NRS Frame Width: 66"
Maximum Frame Length: 83"
Repair Kit: Yes
Warranty: 3 Years Retail, 1 Years Commercial

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts
 
4.5

(based on 2 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

Reviewed by 2 customers

Sort by

Displaying reviews 1-2

Back to top

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Great family boat, some drawbacks but lots of fun

By Nolnacs

from Denver, CO

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Good construction
  • Solid Tracking

Cons

  • Heavy
  • Removable Floor

Best Uses

  • Multiday trips
  • Rafting

Comments about NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts:

Purchased this raft in late winter and started to outfit it for a multi-day trip on the San Juan in UT.

Performance:
This boat rows very easily and has good tracking on the water. I find I can make small or minor adjustments to orientation or direction while flowing with the river and the boat tracks with the current in that position very nicely. Given the weight of the boat and all of the gear in it for 4 over 8 days, it was getting pretty full, however the boat managed the load effortlessly. I found no real impact to the performance of the boat under load.

Comfort:
This is very relative given everyone's rig may be a little different. However I found this to be comfortable and forgiving over a week + trip.

Durability:
The boat seems well constructed and very durable. I have some long term fears about the inflatable floor holding up given some design decisions, but my immediate impressions are that the boat is in extremely well made. I only have about 100 river miles so far. As I said the thwart and floor attachment methods are a concern and the fact that the inflatable floor rests on the bottom of the boat, I'm concerned that sand and grit will ultimately lead to a puncture of the inflatable element of the floor.

Experience:
Two notable experiences this year, one early season trip on the Upper Colorado impressed me. The boat hauled gear with ease and was very maneuverable on the river. This was a solo trip and I made the decision to fit suspended hard or mesh floors over the inflatable floor for more rower and gear stability. The boat is heavy, PVC is heavy. This was a concisous trade-off for me given the pricing. It was a reasonable decision as I could handle the boat alone. This was a great first impression and a short overnight trip.

Second experience was on the San Juan river June 2015. The river was peaking its spring run off exaggerated by strong rainstorms that was causing a number of side canyon flash floods, the river crested at 9K cfs, if you know the San Juan you recognize that being 5x normal flow levels. Needless the say the river was full of debris and silt. Despite the river flowing much faster than normal with a number of changes in its typical characteristics, the Outlaw ran very comfortably. What limited bigger water that the San Juan has to offer was easily handled by the Outlaw 140, as well as a very comfortable boat for 4 family members and their gear for 8 days. However when taking out, the boat seemed to have accumulated twice its normal weight. Once home I finally understood that the inflatable floor is held in via the same methods as the thwarts, a pin or slat through slot mechanism (seems sturdy enough). But this meant that the floor is removable as well as a fantastic place to stow away 90 lbs of San Juan silt. Its taken me 3 days to finally remove all of the added mud and it was difficult to remove the raft floor to clean underneath it. While not a fatal flaw by any means, its a consideration as it has to be cleaned out of accumulated debris.

Overall I'm really happy with the boat. It will be my go to for longer trips and family outings, but I may consider sticking with my Cat when rivers are silty or for short outings given the weight of this boat.

Service and delivery comments:

delivery was very easy and simple, NRS is great to work with.

  • Was this a gift?:
  • No

(3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

SWEET RIDE!

By RJ

from GA

Verified Reviewer

Pros

  • Drop Stitch Floor
  • Tough
  • Turns on a dime
  • Well built

Cons

  • Tracking

Best Uses

  • Camping
  • Fishing
  • Oar Frame Overnighters
  • Rafting

Comments about NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts:

I bought this boat with the big horn II style frame and added a few things. I added the front raised fishing seat, front thigh bar, high back rower seat (Highly recommend over low back seat), and then added the rear fishing seat and thigh hook, as well as the anchor attachment. I also chose pins and clips on this frame setup and have been super happy with the results. Super quiet, easy to use, and my friends who have never rowed a boat can row this rig so I can fish as well. I have been out on 10-12 trips since I received the boat in October and I must say its holding up great. I take care of my gear, but I also use it and don't think twice about it. If its holding up to me then its a solid rig.

  • Was this a gift?:
  • No

Displaying reviews 1-2

Back to top

Do you have questions about this product?

Get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

16 Questions | 16 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    Can you guys pair this raft up with a fishing frame as a package?
    Asked on 3/11/2015 by Junior from Conneticut

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Junior, just put the boat in your shopping cart and when you add the frame, oars and other accessories they will be discounted 10 percent. Or contact us and we can put it together for you. 800.635.5202 or service@nrs.com. We love to talk boats!

      Answered on 3/12/2015 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    Can the Outlaw be rolled up as tight as the hypalon Otter rafts?
    Asked on 7/15/2014 by Tucker from Redding, CA

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Tucker, PVC or urethane coated boat material is stiffer than the hypalon coated Otters and E-boats, so it won't roll up as compactly.

      Answered on 7/22/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    Any idea on the weight without the floor insert and thwarts? Wondering how tough it will be to pack up and load in a vehicle.
    Asked on 7/8/2014 by Louis from Oregon

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Louis, the floor insert and thwarts will weigh about 30 pounds. I load my E-150 by myself. It's almost as heavy as I am so I roll it up on a cooler or dry box as an in-between step for getting it in the pickup bed.

      Answered on 7/22/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    What is the recommended pressure for the tubes, thwarts, and floor?
    Asked on 6/6/2014 by Erich

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Erich, inflate the tubes and thwarts to 2.5 psi and the drop-stitch floor insert to 8-10 psi. You can put more pressure in the floor, but probably won't need to.

      Answered on 6/6/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    How would you compare the Outlaw to the Otter? I have been an NRS owner for years and would like all of the low down on durability and construction of this new boat.....The price seems too good to be true. Thanks!
    Asked on 5/28/2014 by Diablata

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      In dimensions, rocker, etc the Outlaw rafts are similar to their Otter and Expedition cousins. Performance differences come largely from the drop-stitch floor. It's smooth across the bottom (as opposed to the I-beam) which slightly reduces tracking, but consequently increases ease of turning. The stiffness of the insert increases wave punch. Construction: all air holding seams are welded, accessories are glued. PVC material has been around in boat manufacture for a long time and it's significantly cheaper than Pennel Orca (hypalon). Also lowering the cost of PVC boats is the welding. It takes 4-5 times more man hours to make an Otter or E-boat. We believe these boats will be a good value for the recreational boater.

      Answered on 5/28/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    I am curious about the floor design. I've read about how the drop stitch floor is attached, but looking at the photo, there is a noticeable gap in the floor beside the drop stitch deck and the actual floor of the boat. It looks like foot entrapment could happen from the gap, have you guys had any problems with it in testing? Are toes able to fit below the drop stitch deck? I have a friend looking to me for advice on a low cost entry level raft, and I want to know if this is a viable option for him.
    Asked on 5/17/2014 by Learch from Dundee, OR

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      In testing the Outlaw we haven't found that gap between the edge of the drop-stitch insert and the tube to be a problem. A smaller foot can fit in that space but that's not the same as entrapping the foot so it can't be removed. And with the battens in place that secure the insert to the floor, and with the floor properly inflated, you can't slip a foot under the insert.

      Answered on 5/19/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    I am not clear on how the floor would stay in place if you used it as a rowing set up without the thwarts, could you clarify that please.
    Asked on 5/15/2014 by Rich from Colorado Springs, CO

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Rich, the insert is firmly anchored to the floor with several of our Batten Attachment Thwart pieces. One half is glued to the floor, the other half is glued to the bottom of the insert and a plastic batten connects the two. It's a solid set up and it keeps the insert flat and firmly in place.

      Answered on 5/16/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    Would a universal frame fit into any of the Outlaw models?
    Asked on 5/11/2014 by Duder from Livingston mt

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes, the 66"W x 108"L Universal Frame will work with work with this Outlaw 140, by using the 72" side rail section.

      Answered on 5/11/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    You say the dropstitch insert is solidly attached to the single layer floor. How is it attached? How is it removed? A little more detail please. Thanks.
    Asked on 5/11/2014 by Richie from New river va

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Richie, the insert is attached to the floor with our Batten Attachment Thwart (BAT) system of a pair of slots joined by a plastic batten. The insert is removed by deflating it and pulling out the battens.

      Answered on 5/11/2014 by Clyde from NRS
  • NRS Outlaw 140 Self-Bailing Rafts

    Q:

    How is the floor in the Outlaw 140 attached? Glued, welded, stitched?
    Asked on 4/21/2014 by Bryan from Arkansas

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Bryan, the Outlaw has a rather unique floor system. There's a single material layer floor, with bailing holes, that's glued to the perimeter tubes. Then, there's a drop-stitch insert that sits on top of the floor. The insert is solidly attached to the floor, but it's also removable when needed.

      Answered on 4/21/2014 by Clyde from NRS
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

Do you have a question about this product?