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AIRE PVC Kayak Material

Item: 38015.01 | Product Description »

$18.00

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Replacement 1100-denier/24 oz. AIRE PVC Kayak Material. Use Stabond™ to adhere to other PVC material.

Sold by the running foot in a 70" wide roll.

Product Reviews

  (4)

Related Videos

  • video: How To: Inflatable Repair Adhesives Guide
    How To: Inflatable Repair Adhesives Guide
    Length:4:16
  • video: How To: PVC and Urethane Boat Repair
    How To: PVC and Urethane Boat Repair
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Material: 1100-denier/24 oz. PVC material
Dimensions:
  • Sold by the running foot
  • Roll width is about 70"

video: How To: Inflatable Repair Adhesives Guide

How To: Inflatable Repair Adhesives Guide (4:16)

When repairing your Hypalon, PVC or urethane inflatable, or your plastic or composite kayak, it's vital that you choose the right adhesive and solvent for the job. Using the wrong materials will result in a poor repair and wasted effort. In this video, Josh from NRS Repairs shares an inflatable repair adhesives guide to help you understand when to use such glues as Clifton Hypalon, Shore, Stabond, Clifton Urethane, Vynabond and G/flex Epoxy. Solvents for repair prep are important too; you'll also learn when you can use toluene, MEK, acetone and alcohol.

video: How To: PVC and Urethane Boat Repair

How To: PVC and Urethane Boat Repair (3:11)

It's important to master the skills and techniques of patching your urethane or PVC fabric inflatable boat. In this video the NRS Repairs Department goes over the step-by-step process for finding the leak, preparing the surface of the patch and boat, applying the glue and rolling on the patch. The use of Clifton Urethane Adhesive is demonstrated, but the same techniques work with Stabond Adhesive, Vynabond and other PVC/urethane-type adhesives. Using these methods you can also add D-rings, foot cups and wear strips to your boat.

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3 Questions | 8 Answers
Displaying questions 1-3
  • AIRE PVC Kayak Material

    Q:

    Is this PVC coated material and if so, what is the core material? I am looking for pvc fabric to use on a skin on frame kayak.
    Asked on 4/7/2013 by Mark from plymouth, mi

    3 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes, It is PVC-coated polyester base fabric.

      Answered on 4/7/2013 by Clyde from NRS
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I can't say for sure, but this seems to be a single material, rather than coated. I used it to patch several long slashes on my inflatable kayak. As I cut through it with scissors, last year, I think there were some threads, but it looks like a single type of material. The patches are holding up great. Hope this helps.

      Answered on 4/7/2013 by Andrew from Boston, MA
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes it is PVC material. The core--not really the core, but a scrim is polyester, also known by the trade name of Dacron.
      A scrim is a cheese cloth like fabric which is used to hold the PVC together, provide strength and prevent stretching.
      Some pros and cons. It is very strong and durable. Probably subject to abrasion and puncture on a skin on frame, but possibly less that other fabrics. It doesn't stretch at all--and is pretty stiff. This means it will be hard to assemble in the big pieces used on a boat. There are only three possible joining methods for pvc--solvent welding, radio frequency welding and sewing.
      It will be difficult to sew large pieces without a machine with a huge throat--I've tried--and you will have holes that you need to patch with probably a solvent. RF welding requires a expensive machine and also might be difficult. Solvent welding would require very accurate cuts, and placement. Probably difficult with a one off design--you can't really use a more flexible fabric to get the pattern.
      But good luck.

      Answered on 4/8/2013 by Anonymous
  • AIRE PVC Kayak Material

    Q:

    Sorry I could not find where to leave a reply to the answers to my first question so hopefully everyone can see this response. Thank you everyone for the excellent responses, this is valuable information that will really help me out. I liked the idea of the cover to put around the yak. Maybe I could devise a way to secure a removable piece of material to use for long remote trips, just seems like some issues could arise. I think what I will do is just put wear patches in the most vulnerable spots and try to limit how much material I put on to avoid any issues. I don't think I will have any issues on my trip but it's always good to be prepared! Thank you all so much for your excellent responses I found them extremely valuable.
    Asked on 10/30/2012 by James from Phoenix

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Thanks for the kudos. Hopefully folks that helped you will see it.

      Answered on 10/31/2012 by Clyde from NRS
  • AIRE PVC Kayak Material

    Q:

    I was wondering what the main difference is between a 24oz PVC material and a higher weight PVC material like a 37oz material. I see on the 37oz material it also says 1000 denier. Is this similar to a thread count in other fabrics? What denier is the 24oz PVC? I am trying to select a material to use to reinforce the most vulnerable spots on my inflatable. I want to add a few square feet worth of the material to the underside where I have had to patch a few pinhole leaks from abrasion. Is it a bad idea to glue a few square feet worth of stronger material to the bottom of my inflatable? I'm planning a 70 mile trip for next summer and I don't want to tear out the bottom of my yak when I'm in such a remote place.
    Asked on 10/25/2012 by James from Phoenix

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I cannot answer your questions about the weight but I think your idea about
      adding thickness to the botton oif your inflatable is a good idea. Just
      make sure the material is compatable with the material on your inflatable.

      Answered on 10/25/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi James;
      I got this as a "can you help a fellow shopper" email from NRS.
      The 1000 denier is the thread weight of the fabric. It is not exactly the same as fabric weight, since a mesh of 1000 denier will be much lighter than a close weave, but they will both be about the same thickness. The denier only applies to the polyester reinforcement--and is basically there to prevent stretching, and to provide something for the much heavier and stretchier pvc to hang onto. 1000 denier ought to be pretty adequate--strength of thousands of pounds per square inch--its the weight used for heavy duty luggage.
      The 24 oz. is more of a kayak weight. The 37oz is probably what you would get on a 100 lb. raft. The heavier weight makes up for the 1 ton weight of the loaded raft vs. less than 800 lbs of a kayak.
      I have extensive experience wilderness tripping with my 3 Sevlor Sea Kayaks.. They are built, with I believe, about 24 oz fabric. This has proven adequate to scrape over quite a few rocks and gravel bars, not to mention our usual method of beaching it by running full speed into the beach. The two real enemies of inflatables are hot sun--increases pressure and softens seams--and constant rubbing. We are pretty careful. On noon time stops we keep it at least half in the water to keep it cool. Likewise we pull in out at night only after the sun is pretty much gone. If we are stopping in a rocky area, we anchor the stern out with a bow line to the shore--so it will not be rubbing on the rocks.
      i've had two small leaks--pinhole --takes a week to deflate type. One we got by I think a metal latch rubbing on a long trip. The other was a seam leak on a used boat. I suspect previous owner left it out in the sun. I sucessfuly repaired both using Sevylor Seamseal (google it)--which I would highly recommend. You just drip it on until enough builds up to seal the leak. Practically invisible and much easlier to use than a patch which doesn't work well on seam leaks anyway.
      I wouldn't try reinforcing the bottom by gluing on an extra layer. I would worry that it would distort the boat. Also there is a real possiblity tthat using all of that solvent might start a seam leak which would be real trouble. Two alternatives if you are really paranoid: 1.making a boot--i.e. a fabric shell which will cover the whole thing. Trampoline cloth might work well. Reasonably cheap and light. Tough and drains quickly. 2. carrying along an extra cheap inflatable. The Tahiti style kayaks only wiegh about 20 lbs and pack in a small bag. They are amazingly cabable and tough--just not very comfortable. Same goes for a cheap raft. I am actually more paranoid about pumps. I always carry an extra.
      Hope all of this helps.
      Lyle

      Answered on 10/25/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi
      I unfortunately dont know the specific answer to the question, but can say
      that I had a similar issue with one of my inflatables, that I had ripped a
      large hole in the underside.
      I stead of just patching, I patched then covered the whole underside with a
      protective layer. Besides the skill involved in this process (which was
      tricky), the two fabrics did not stetch at the same rate afterwards, which
      resulted in distortion of the craft, and pressure on seams some of which
      started leaking.
      So I would go to various chat forums to get advice before starting the
      project

      Answered on 10/26/2012 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The 24 oz. material has an 1100-denier base fabric and is used on AIRE IKs. The 37 oz. material has 1670-denier base fabric and is used on their rafts. Denier is a measure of thread weight - wt. in grams of 8,000 meters of thread. The lighter material should be good as a wear patch. I assume you're putting this on a PVC boat; in which case I recommend Clifton Urethane adhesive.

      Answered on 10/26/2012 by Clyde from NRS
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AIRE PVC Kayak Material
 
5.0

(based on 4 reviews)

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          • No (4)

        Reviewed by 4 customers

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        5.0

        Excellent material, did the trick

        By Andrew

        from Boston, MA

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Durable
        • Easy to Use

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Repair inflatable kayak

          Comments about AIRE PVC Kayak Material:

          Works great. I used it to repair a series of tears in my inflatable kayak totaling 41" in length. I have plenty left over for future repairs.

          • Was this a gift?:
          • No
           
          5.0

          Glad to have it but never want to use it

          By Epic

          from Everett, Wa

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Boat repair

              Comments about AIRE PVC Kayak Material:

              Just have it in case....

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No
               
              5.0

              Perfect for repair kit.

              By bryak

              from frederick,md

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Has everything you need
              • Perfect ammount

              Cons

              • You cant pick colors

              Best Uses

              • Great for repairs

              Comments about AIRE PVC Kayak Material:

              This is the perfect ammount of material,i just wish i could have gotten just the colors that i need to match my raft color.

              Service and delivery comments:

              Delivery was fast,as usual,thanks NRS.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No
               
              5.0

              tough material, easy to work with

              By tibiaornottibia

              from ashland, oregon

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

                Cons

                  Best Uses

                    Comments about AIRE PVC Kayak Material:

                    doughnut hole kayak repair at high stress point (valve), holding up very well

                    Service and delivery comments:

                    satisfactory

                    • Was this a gift?:
                    • No

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